Galileo and Aristotle - Monday’s Lansing State Journal...

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Unformatted text preview: Monday’s Lansing State Journal MSU grad’s particle physics rap is YouTube hit ◆ Katie McAlpine ◆ With an intro from MC Hawking Aristotle vs Galileo 384-322 BC Tutor of Alexander the Great Aristotle’s aim was to systematize existing knowledge, just as Euclid had systematized geometry. His systematic approach became the method from which Western science arose. 1564-1642 Born the same year as Shakespeare Became an advocate of the new theory of the solar system advocated by Copernicus. Ran afoul of the church and was warned not to teach and not to hold Copernican views. Found guilty in a trial and forced to recount his views. Aristotle on motion Three types of motion ◆ natural motion ◆ violent motion ◆ celestial motion Natural motion ◆ solid objects (or liquids) fall because they seek their natural resting place (center of the Earth) ◆ air likes to rise upwards, as do flames, since that is their natural resting place ◆ so natural motion is either straight up or straight down Aristotle on motion Three types of motion ◆ natural motion ◆ violent motion ◆ celestial motion Violent motion ◆ horizontal motion ◆ imposed by pushes or pulls; objects move not by their nature, but because of impressed forces ◆ example: arrow shot from bow; bowstring imparts force to make arrow move horizontally ◆ what’s the problem with this? Aristotle on motion Three types of motion ◆ natural motion ◆ violent motion ◆ celestial motion Celestial motion ◆ motion of the sun, moon and stars; perfect circles ◆ sun, moon and stars formed of perfect, incorruptible substance called ether (or quintessence) Inclined plane He performed a series of measurements rolling a ball on an inclined plane ◆ those of you in ISP209L will do something similar Why an inclined plane?...
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This note was uploaded on 10/17/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Thompson during the Spring '11 term at Michigan State University.

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Galileo and Aristotle - Monday’s Lansing State Journal...

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