GBL_395_-_Eminent_Domain_HW__F10_

GBL_395_-_Eminent_Domain_HW__F10_ - The Kelo v New London...

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The Kelo v. New London Decision – What Did the Supreme Court Hold? What Are the Implications for Economic Redevelopment in the US? Example: Detroit 1. Read Kelo v. New London on pp, 420-21 of your text and answer the following questions: A. Describe the re-development plan proposed by the City of New London. B. What happened when a few homeowners decided not to sell? C. A group of property owners fought the city’s action in court. What did they argue? D. When are takings allowed under the US Constitution? E. What did the Supreme Court rule in regards to economic development? What precedent did the Court cite in making this ruling? F. Whose “job” is it to limit “takings”? 2. Read the following articles . The city of Detroit has embarked on an ambitious yet controversial plan regarding redevelopment. This is described in the articles below. Do you support this plan even if Detroit has to resort to eminent domain because significant numbers of residents in areas approved for downsizing refused to move? Why or why not? Make sure you reference the articles in your answer. by Craig Ruff December 16, 2008 1
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To New Yorkers and tourists, the 843 acres (2.6 x 0.5 miles) of Central Park are a respite from density and intensity. Detroiters are not oppressed by density. Theirs is a city using at most 50 percent of its space. A city built for two million people now hosts 900,000 and is on trajectory to fall to 700,000 in the next couple of decades. Detroit hosts roughly 9,000 people per square mile; Manhattan hosts more than 70,000. Larger than Central Park, Detroit’s Belle Isle has provided recreation, education and entertainment for millions of Detroit area residents. Detroiters often reside in ample 1,200-square-foot homes on 1/8-acre (or larger) plots. New Yorkers often live in 400-square-foot studios in high-rise apartment buildings. In addition to housing, Detroit’s acreage used to host envious retail stores, like Hudson’s, and hordes of commercial office hubs. Many are gone. Sad testimony to that is the Detroit newspaper front- page headline a few years ago about the planned opening of a book store in downtown. Nor are Detroiters oppressed by intensity. It’s a laid-back, uncongested city compared to peers and its own hey-day in the 1950s. While about 80,000 people still work in downtown Detroit, it’s a far cry from the past. In downtown and neighborhoods, you never see a frenzied crush of people, stressed to the max by high-pressure jobs and tortuously time-consuming daily chores. 2
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Keeping in mind first and foremost the quality of life of 900,000 people, I suggest that Detroit evolves, with much state and federal support, into a unique 21st-century American city. That it caters to those athletically and culturally inclined who wish to escape density and intensity of other large cities and have easy access to amenities and daily staples. Detroit, in short, becomes a myriad of Central Parks: the greenest large city in America, indeed
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GBL_395_-_Eminent_Domain_HW__F10_ - The Kelo v New London...

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