week4 - HB 490 Introduction to Wine Lesson 4: The Theory...

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1 HB 490 Introduction to Wine Lesson 4: The Theory and Practice of Sensory Evaluations Sensory Evaluation • Your sensory tools: – Sight, smell, taste and touch • Systematic approach: – Attentive examination – Analytical evaluation – Hedonic consideration • Identification of wine attributes – Increased understanding » Wine expertise Sensation versus Perception • Sensation – An organism’s (your) response to a stimulus in the environment • Perception – The brain’s (your) interpretation of the information gathered by the senses
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2 Sensory Stimulus • Sensory stimuli in wine: – Any chemical, physical or thermal activator in the wine that can elicit a response in a sense receptor • The sense receptor sends an impulse to your brain for consideration and assessment – Intensity of stimuli? – Balance of stimuli? – Comparative assessment with earlier experiences? » Access your library of memories and experiences » New sensation or known sensation? » Attempt to retrieve descriptive words Sensory Thresholds • The environment (the wine?) may contain stimuli that you do not notice – Sensory thresholds: • Threshold of sensation (absolute or /detection threshold) – The smallest amount of a stimulus that can produce a noticeable, but unidentifiable, sensation • Threshold of perception (recognition threshold) – The smallest amount that can be accurately described or named; Typically a higher level than above • Differential/Difference threshold – The minimum amount of a stimulus that needs to be added to (or removed from) an existing and perceptible amount to be noticed Sensory Thresholds • Sugar/sweetness is one of the stimuli you may find in wine – The average recognizable threshold to recognize and correctly name sweetness from sugars is 1 gram per 10 milliliters (1g/100ml) • This is the average Threshold of Perception – That is, at that concentration 50% percent of the people tested were able to correctly identify the sensation. The other 50% is divided into those who have higher and lower thresholds. » According to Amerine and Roessler (1983) the range for the threshold of perception is 0.5g/100ml ÅÆ 2.5g/100ml
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3 Sensory Thresholds • All different! – If a group of folks are tasting a wine, or some other food or beverage for that matter, you may all experience the food somewhat differently • This is due to your varying thresholds. • If you find this interesting, check out the work of – Linda Bartoshuk – Tim Hanni Sight • The first step in examining wine is to look at it! – Sight receptors in the retina transform light waves to signals the brain interprets – Three kinds of color receptors, integrate • Discriminate – Hundreds of hues – Different intensities Sight • Visual examination: – Wide range of color • Green tinged, Straw colored, Gold color, Light brown, Amber/Brown • Purple, Ruby red, Red , Red-brown, Mahogany-red, Amber/Brown – Wide range of intensities – Relative clarity
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week4 - HB 490 Introduction to Wine Lesson 4: The Theory...

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