week5 - White Table Wine Production HB 490 Introduction to...

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1 White Table Wine Production HB 490 Introduction to Wine Lesson 5 (Chapter 3) Making White Wine • This lesson will discuss basic science and technology as it relates to white wine making – Oenology and some viticulture • The goal is to provide you with an understanding of – The process – How certain sensory characteristics “came about” • Vineyard practices (viticulture) and its role will be discussed later – (Lesson 13; Chapter 11) • 15 steps Type and Style • Envision the Desired Type and Style of Wine – Our styles of white wine are mostly based on the white wines of Germany and France • While Germany and France are for the most part cool- climate wines, many US wines are produced in warmer climates • The styles can range – Simple generic “jug” wines – Premium, low production, table wines, from narrowly specified appellations • Wineries may produce and release a (wide) variety of wines
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2 Type and Style • The desired type and style may require a particular varietal grown in a particular location and climate • If varietal characteristics are not desired/needed, the choice is wide open The Grapes • The right combination of grape variety and climate is a key determinant – For premium wines, a cooler climate is normally preferred • Premium wines can be produced in warm climates – Climate refers to the generally prevailing weather condition in a region The Grapes • Most desired for premium white wine • Chardonnay • Gewürztraminer • Riesling – White Riesling – Johannisberg Riesling • Sauvignon Blanc • Sémillon • Less commonly used for premium wine • Chenin Blanc • French Colombard • Grey Riesling – Welschriesling – Italian Riesling – Chaucé Gris • Sylvaner
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3 The Grapes • Wineries may – Grow their own grapes – Contract with growers –Bo th • In contracts payments for the grapes are often based on – The composition of the grapes at the time of harvest – Viticultural practices Viticulture • Farming for flavor • Varietals are impacted by climate variations – Macroclimate • Generalized to region – Mesoclimate • More narrowly defined (text suggests the vineyard) – Microclimate • Immediately within and around the grape canopy Viticulture • Location of the vineyard will determine much • Elements beyond climate include soil depth, soil texture/composition, topography • All of these relatively “fixed factors” influence – The color, sugar, acidity, aroma and flavor compounds in the grapes
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4 Viticulture • The microclimate can be manipulated somewhat • Variable factors include – Irrigation, fertilization, canopy and fruit management (pruning) • Control –G row th » Vigorous vines produce less fruit – Fruit and foliage exposure to light » Grapes – fruity flavor compounds » Leaves – grassy, herbal flavors Grape Ripening • As grapes grow and ripen – They get bigger and softer – The chlorophyll (green) fades and other pigments become apparent
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This note was uploaded on 10/17/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Thompson during the Spring '11 term at Michigan State University.

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week5 - White Table Wine Production HB 490 Introduction to...

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