week7 - Red Table Wine Production Lesson 7 (Chapter 5)...

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1 Red Table Wine Production Lesson 7 (Chapter 5) Introduction • Red wines typically have more intense aromas and flavors than white wines. • The aromas and flavors are extracted along with color and tannins from grape skins during fermentation • This extraction is arguably the most important step in red wine production Introduction • The extracted tannins protect red wines during aging, allowing the wines to develop complexity – Bouquet • The extended extraction also brings depth in color and flavor
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2 Envision the Type/Style of Wine • Red wines have a broad range of styles – From light, delicate blush and rosé wines to dark, intense, rich, full-flavored wines • The decision to make a particular style of wine dictates – The choice of grape variety • Specific varietals have specific characteristics – The type of treatment the wine receives Type/Style of Wine • In the past French names were often invoked to suggest a style/variety – Making use of regional place names is less common now •WTO – World Trade Organization •W IPO – World Intellectual Property Organization Varieties, Climates, and Clones • The proper match between grape variety and climate is crucial for wine production – Pigments in wines and grapes change their color in response to variations in pH. • Cool Conditions – lower pH (reddish tint). • Warm Conditions –
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3 Varieties, Climates, and Clones • A varietals may have a preferred climate – Pinot Noir develops the best color in cool climates – Zinfandel can take comparatively more heat Varieties, Climates, and Clones • Important element in wine production – which clone to use. – 150+ different Pinot Noir clones in Burgundy • May be 1000 clones world-wide – There are significant viticultural and enological differences between the various Pinot Noir clones – How do you pick the best clone? » Research, e.g., Critical Viticultural Practices • Best quality red wines: –For example • Growers need to manage the Cabernet Sauvignon vines canopy to promote development of varietal character – Shaded berries » Ripen slower and have less color » More likely to develop Botrytis Cinerea
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4 Critical Viticultural Practices • Soil quality –“Younger”, finer soils • Greater water holding capacities – Greater yields and wines with grassy and vegetative flavors. –Older soils • Higher percentage of gravel – Fruitier wine flavors. Critical Viticultural Practices • Younger, more prolific vines, and • Grapes harvested at lower maturity – Produce • More vegetative flavor and less fruit • The same conditions that produce the best flavor, also produce the best color Critical Viticultural Practices • Color production is also impacted by – Fruit volume • Too much lower color – Vine vigor • A vigorous vine focuses on vine and leaf growth, with the berry crop suffering – Irrigation, nutrition and disease
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5 Critical Viticultural Practices
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week7 - Red Table Wine Production Lesson 7 (Chapter 5)...

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