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week13 - Great Wines Are Made In The Vineyard Lesson...

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1 Great Wines Are Made In The Vineyard Lesson 13 (Chapter 11) Deceiving Similarities Is a vineyard a vineyard? – The vineyard landscapes vary greatly across/within regions – Viticulturists/grape growers in different regions apply different growing practices/systems A Mosel(le) Vineyard A Napa Valley Vineyard Vines in the Vineyard Vines per acre: – Premier French and German vineyards may have as many as 2000-3000 vines/acre – Such high density are also occurring in New World Vineyards It is still not uncommon to have 360-1200 vines/acre – Replanting of vines are often done at greater densities
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2 Leaf Arrangement Premium wine growers control the development of their vines’ canopies – Optimize Light interception Wine quality – Intercepted light is used for photosynthesis Sugars are transported to the developing fruit Thin Canopies are Good The more intense the light, the more intense the photosynthesis – Up to The Light Saturation Point Limiting factors: Available chlorophyll, light wave-lengths, available carbon, temperature, available enzymes – Leaves cannot use all the sun: The vine benefits from more leaves – Leaves that do not get enough sun, will not produce enough sugar for their own needs, “starving” the fruit The vine benefits from less leaves Thin Canopies are Good Four Reasons: – It takes energy to grow and sustain leaves – Shaded leaves will not produce enough energy to sustain their own needs – Shaded roots produce a smaller crop next year – Shaded leaves and fruits produce wine of lesser quality
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3 Shaded and Fruit
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