EML2322L Fastener Facts

EML2322L Fastener Facts - EML2322L Design & Manufacturing...

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EML2322L – Design & Manufacturing Laboratory Fastener Facts 1. Definitions. The term fasteners refers to hardware that can be easily installed and removed with hand or power tools; this commonly includes screws, bolts, nuts and rivets. The term bolt refers to a male fastener that requires a nut to function, whereas the term screw refers to a male fastener that is mated into a matching female thread in a workpiece. A bolt and nut assembly requires two tools to tighten or loosen, whereas a screw only requires one (the part with the female threaded hole is typically stationary). 2. Common fastener types. The most common male fastener types used in industry are hex head, slotted head, flat (or countersunk) head, round head, allen (or socket) head, button head and socket set screw. The most common nuts used in industry are regular hexagonal nuts, low hex (jam) nuts and nylon ring elastic stop nuts (also known as “lock nuts”). 3. Bolt nomenclature. Be familiar with the following parts of a bolt: head, bearing surface, shank, grip length, total length, thread length, thread pitch, thread crest, thread root and point. 4. Fastener and thread types. There are two general classes of fastener threads: English and metric. For each type (regardless of country of origin) there are two series of threads: fine thread and course thread. (Refer to the tap table, as it contains all of this information in one convenient location.) Fine threads are stronger when the material the nut is made from is strong compared to the bolt material and course threads are stronger when the material the nut is made from is weak compared to the bolt material. Refer to the lecture notes on fasteners and the tap chart for a proper explanation of this important statement. 5. Rolled threads. Quality fasteners have rolled threads produced via rolling or sliding dies as seen here . Rolled threads (as opposed to thread cut on a lathe or with a cutting
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This note was uploaded on 10/18/2011 for the course EML 2023L taught by Professor M.braddock during the Spring '11 term at University of Florida.

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EML2322L Fastener Facts - EML2322L Design & Manufacturing...

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