EML2322L-Design Process

EML2322L-Design Process - Introduction to the Design...

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Introduction to the Design Process Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) Definition of Design Engineering design is the process of devising a system, component, or process to meet desired needs. It is a decision-making process (often iterative), in which the engineering sciences and mathematics are applied to convert resources optimally to meet a stated objective. Among the fundamental elements of the design process are the establishment of objectives and criteria, synthesis, analysis, construction, testing and evaluation. Introduction to the Design Process 1
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Joseph Shigley ( Mechanical Engineering Design ) Definition of Design Mechanical design means the design of components and systems of a mechanical nature—machines, products, structures, devices and instruments. For the most part mechanical design uses mathematics, materials, and the engineering-mechanics sciences. Additionally, it uses engineering graphics and the ability to communicate verbally to clearly express your ideas. Mechanical engineering design includes all mechanical design, but it is a broader study because it includes all the disciplines of mechanical engineering, such as the thermal fluids and heat transfer sciences too. Aside from the fundamental sciences which are required, the first studies in mechanical engineering design are in mechanical design , and that is the approach taken in this course. Introduction to the Design Process 2
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Steps of the Design Process 1. Recognize the Need The first step is to establish the ultimate purpose of the project. Often, this is in the form of a general statement of the client’s dissatisfaction with a current situation. example – “There is too much damage to bumpers in low-speed collisions.” This is a general statement that does not comment on the design approach to the problem. It does not say that the bumper should be stronger or more flexible. Recognition and phrasing of the need are often very creative acts because the need may only be a sensing that something is not right. For this reason, sensitive people are generally more creative. example: the need to do something about a food packaging machine may be indicated by the noise level, the variation in package weight, or by slight but perceptible variations in the quality of the packaging. Introduction to the Design Process 3
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2. Problem Definition This is one of the most critical steps of the design process. There is an iteration between the definition of the problem and the recognition of need. Often the true problem is not what it first seems. Problem Definition
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This note was uploaded on 10/18/2011 for the course EML 2023L taught by Professor M.braddock during the Spring '11 term at University of Florida.

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EML2322L-Design Process - Introduction to the Design...

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