trusses_sections 2

trusses_sections 2 - long A B C D E F G H I 1000 lb 500 lb...

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Trusses – Method of Sections Unlike the method of pins the method of sections is not very amenable to computer solution. However, it is a very efficient way of getting particular truss member forces by hand since we take one or more sections through the truss to expose the member whose force we want and then use the equations of equilibrium for the coplanar force system of the parts of the truss we have cut off. 0 x F = + 0 y F = + 0 z M = + The moment equation here is especially useful since we can choose the point we take moments about to eliminate as many unwanted unknowns as possible. A B C D E F G H I 1000 lb 500 lb 6’ each vertical section is 4’
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Unformatted text preview: long A B C D E F G H I 1000 lb 500 lb 6’ each vertical section is 4’ long Example: Suppose we want to find the force in member GH, which is buried deeply in the truss C D E F G B 4’ 4’ 6’ 4’ 1000 lb 500 lb FBC FBG FGH B M = ∑ + ( 29 ( 29 ( 29 ( 29 1000 12 500 4 6 2333.3 GH GH F F lb + + = = -FGH = 2333.3 lb C Zero Force Members A truss may have members which do not carry any loads (zero force members) but which are needed for stability or for other reasons. The truss we just considered is a good example: A B C D E F G H I 1000 lb 500 lb 6’ Can you identify the zero force members?...
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trusses_sections 2 - long A B C D E F G H I 1000 lb 500 lb...

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