Rmomentum - Momentum We defined an object’s momentum:...

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Unformatted text preview: Momentum We defined an object’s momentum: Momentum of the object = Mass of the object × Velocity of the object An object’s momentum is a measure of how hard it is to stop or change the motion of the object. How do we change an object’s momentum? By exerting a net force on the object for some period of time. The more force and the longer time; the greater the change in momentum. We define an impulse exerted on an object: Net Impulse on object × = Net Force on object Time force is applied = Change in Momentum of object and: Net Impulse on object 1 Momentum, Impulse, and the Second Law (optional for 11th Grade) The Impulse - Change in Momentum Relationship is: Net Impulse on object = Change in Momentum of object = Net Force = Fnet ∆ t. Since: Net Impulse × Time interval We can call the Change in Momentum: m ∆v Then (setting impulse equal to change in momentum): Fnet ∆t = m ∆v If I solve this equation for Fnet : Fnet = m ∆v ∆t Remember the definition of acceleration? a = So: ∆v ∆t Fnet = m a So this Impulse-Momentum relationship is just a restatement of the Second Law. 2 Collisions • Elastic Collisions Collisions that don’t generate heat or deformation • Inelastic Collisions Collisions that do generate heat and/or deformation • Totally Inelastic collisions Collisions in which the objects couple together. Momentum is conserved in all collisions. 3 ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/19/2011 for the course PHY 2020 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Rmomentum - Momentum We defined an object’s momentum:...

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