Lecture 1 Fall 2011 9-20-1 - Sensation and Perception 0%...

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Sensation and Perception 0% Chapter 6: Part I
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Sensation and Perception The study of how the world out there gets in… how we construct internal representations of the external world
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0% “El Jaelo,” John Singer Sargent Credit: Mark Hayden/Artchive.com
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Andalusia
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Sensation vs. Perception Sensation refers to the stimulation of the sensory organs by physical energy from the external world, and the conversion of this energy into neural signals. “The Forest Has Eyes,” Bev Doolittle
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Sensation vs. Perception Perception refers to our interpretation of what we sense based on experience, expectations, and surroundings. “The Forest Has Eyes,” Bev Doolittle
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Sensation vs. Perception Sensation and perception are not the same. For example, people who suffer from prosopagnosia cannot perceive human faces, but they can perceive objects.
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Sensation vs. Perception Sensation and perception are not the same. For example, people who suffer from prosopagnosia cannot perceive human faces, but they can perceive objects. http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=k5bvnXYIQG8&vq=medium
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Sensation vs. Perception http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=IGQmdoK_ZfY&vq=medium
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Sensation and Perception Sensing the World: Basic Principles Thresholds
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Absolute Thresholds Absolute threshold the minimum stimulation necessary to detect physical stimulation half the time; that is, a particular light, sound, pressure, taste, or odor. Credit: Dhenbenn (left), Andre Ueberbach (right)
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Absolute Thresholds The absolute threshold for human vision is equivalent to the amount of energy emitted by a single candle on a completely dark night from 30 miles away, while that for hearing is equivalent to the amount of energy emitted by the tick of a watch at 20 feet. Credit: Matthew Bowden
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Signal Detection Physical World Psychological  World Light Brightness Sound Volume Pressure Weight Sugar Sweet Psychophysics is the study of the relationship between physical characteristics of physical stimuli and our perceptual experiences of them, and makes use of signal detection to measure absolute thresholds and other properties of sensation and perception.
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Signal Detection In a signal detection task, across a number of trials, stimuli of different intensities are presented. The test-taker’s task is to indicate when he or she perceives the stimulus, and absolute threshold is the intensity at which he or she is correct 50% of the time. The above graph shows that the absolute threshold for vision is about 12 lumens .
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Signal Detection Stimuli below the absolute threshold are subliminal (literally “below threshold”), and we are influenced by subliminal stimulation.
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For example, subjects rated people in photos
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This note was uploaded on 10/18/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 101 taught by Professor Caldwell during the Fall '10 term at Michigan State University.

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Lecture 1 Fall 2011 9-20-1 - Sensation and Perception 0%...

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