Intro to Philosophy Class4

Intro to Philosophy Class4 - The Ontological Argument The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The Ontological Argument The Ontological Argument • Anselm wanted to offer an a priori argument for the existence of God. • To be distinguished from the arguments we’ve seen which, to a greater or lesser extent, depend on a posteriori grounds. The Ontological Argument Therefore, Lord, who grant understanding to faith, grant me that, in so far as you know it beneficial, I understand that you are as we believe and you are that which we believe. Now we believe that you are something than which nothing greater can be imagined. Then is there no such nature, since the fool has said in his heart: God is not? But certainly this same fool, when he hears this very thing that I am saying - something than which nothing greater can be imagined - understands what he hears; and what he understands is in his understanding, even if he does not understand that it is. For it is one thing for a thing to be in the understanding and another to understand that a thing is. For when a painter imagines beforehand what he is going to make, he has in his understanding what he has not yet made but he does not yet understand that it is. But when he has already painted it, he both has in his understanding what he has already painted and understands that it is. Therefore even the fool is bound to agree that there is at least in the understanding something than which nothing greater can be imagined, because when he hears this he understands it, and whatever is understood is in the understanding.be imagined, because when he hears this he understands it, and whatever is understood is in the understanding....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 10/19/2011 for the course PHIL 104 taught by Professor Bunzl during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 16

Intro to Philosophy Class4 - The Ontological Argument The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online