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Week 02 Paragraph Punc - Punctuation and Mechanics Writing...

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1 Punctuation and Mechanics Writing Paragraphs/Thesis/Outline
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2 The Living End: The Period (.) The period is the red light at the end of a sentence. When you reach the period, it's all over. Whatever thought you were trying to convey has been delivered. Decimal in numbers Headings in a report, e-mail, or memo don t need a full stop
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3 Uncommonly Useful: The Comma (,) There's nothing much to punctuating a sentence, really, beyond a little comma sense. Get the commas right, and the rest will fall into place. Cora claimed Frank planned the murder. Cora, claimed Frank, planned the murder. Here's another pair of examples with completely different meanings: Augie quit saying he was looking for another job. Augie quit, saying he was looking for another job. The lesson: Don't take commas for granted. They're like yellow traffic lights. If you ignore one, you could be in for a bumpy ride.
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4 *In the beginning steps of the reaction process were not clear because we did not adequately understand the mechanisms involved. *Before we finished stirring the reaction mixture had turned to a deep blue color.
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5 Uncommonly Useful: The Comma (,) Use a comma to separate clauses (big chunks of a sentence) joined by and, but, so, or, for, nor, and yet . Tina hadn't left the city in months, and by Friday she was climbing the walls.
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6 Uncommonly Useful: The Comma (,) A pair of commas cordons off information that is an aside, exclamation, or an addition. Readers can, if they wish, leapfrog the cordoned off area and still make sense of what is said. Laughing and joking, the students entered the library . The librarian , a strict disciplinarian, frowned and walked toward them . He stopped in front of poor Roberto , who was making the most noise.
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7 Uncommonly Useful: The Comma (,) Necessary (restrictive) modifiers A person who speaks three languages is trilingual. *A person is trilingual. Extra-information (non-restrictive) modifiers Roger, who speaks three languages, is trilingual. Roger is trilingual. Appositives I have two brothers. My brother Jerry works in Hong Kong. Tim, my other brother, works in Sydney.
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8 Uncommonly Useful: The Comma (,) Planets that contain water, can support life. Earth, our home planet, is two-thirds water. You don t often see men or women, wearing hats these days. Airline companies that offer comfortable seats and good food are popular with frequent fliers. Business travelers like to fly to Magic Carpet Airlines which offers excellent food and gracious service.
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9 Uncommonly Useful: The Comma (,) If there's no and or but in between, use a semicolon instead: Tina hadn t left the city in months; by Friday she was climbing the walls.
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10 Uncommonly Useful: The Comma (,) I was born in a small town but my family moved to the capital when I was fourteen.
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