Ethics Assignment 1

Ethics Assignment 1 - Does the Good Life Consist in Getting...

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Does the Good Life Consist in Getting What You Want? Jerry Imel Ethics/Philosophy 202 Dr. Jeffrey P. Fry September 30, 2010
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Jerry Imel PHIL 202 - Ethics 09/23/2010 Does the Good Life Consist in Getting What You Want? If the good life is determined by a person living the life they want to live, than you could argue that getting what you want constitutes a good life. If the answer were that simple, however, there would be no need for me to go any further in writing this paper. As we are about to explore, there are more things to a good life than just getting what you want. We will look at and elaborate many of the arguments presented by Shafer- Landau, against the desire theory. Getting what you want may not be necessary for promoting your good. There are things that we need, that can promote our well being, but we may not necessarily want to be a part of the means by which they are given to us. For example, I provide a benefit to my daughter by telling her to brush her teeth. Brushing her teeth is not something she wants to do, but it promotes good oral hygiene. It is our moral responsibility to do things for our children that will benefit them. If a child was to get everything he or she wanted, then as a parent, we would not get what we want, by providing a benefit to the child. “We can improve the lives of people without getting them what they want. They may, later on, approve of our actions and be pleased that we acted as we did. But this after-the-fact approval is something very different from desire satisfaction.” Getting what you want may not be sufficient for promoting your good. Sometimes you feel that something will be beneficial if you have it, but in all actuality, it does nothing to promote your good. I cannot count the number of times I have felt hungry enough that I found myself eating at a buffet. I desired food, and a wide array of
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Jerry Imel PHIL 202 - Ethics 09/23/2010 choices. If you are anything like me, you can understand that I feel pretty bad after eating at a buffet. I often find myself eating to satisfy my initial hunger, but I typically overeat, as I want to make sure I get what I have paid for. The act of overindulging often leads me to feeling bad about eating so much, and I can attest that the desire to eat large portions did not promote good in my life. If anything, it lowered my life
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This note was uploaded on 10/09/2011 for the course ASTRO 47280 taught by Professor Islam during the Spring '09 term at Ball State.

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Ethics Assignment 1 - Does the Good Life Consist in Getting...

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