Chem Lab 4

Chem Lab 4 - Gas Law Lab Joshua Wexler Abstract In this...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Gas Law Lab – Joshua Wexler Abstract In this experiment, each member of the lab found the mass, boiling point, volume, and pressure of a particular gas in order to calculate the gas constant for their compound using the ideal gas law. After comparing our various results for the different gas constants, we concluded that the behavior of real gases was not close enough to that of an ideal gas to use the formula make reliable predictions about the behavior of real gases. Introduction The ideal gas law, PV=nRT, describes the relationship between the four different properties, pressure, volume, number of moles, and temperature, of gases. The R-value represents the ideal gas constant this is .0821. As R represents the ideal gas constant, the relationship between these four different properties only is true for ideal gases. The point of this experiment is to determine if the behavior of real gases is close enough to the behavior of ideal gasses to have any use. Can the formula that describes the relationship between the four different properties of an ideal gas be used to describe a real gas as well? Procedures 1) Fill a 400ml beaker with water and begin to boil it on a hot plate. 2) Acquire a 100ml flask and find its mass. The mass of our flask was 90.371g 3) Acquire acetone and pour some into the flask. Cap the flask. 4) Place the flask into the beaker with boiling water, remove the stopper from the flask’s cap, and place the thermometer in the hole where the stopper was. Make sure the thermometer does not touch the side of the flask as this will throw off the readings. 5) Record the temperature where the gas begins to evaporate. The acetone began to boil at 56.5 degrees Celsius.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6) Once all of the acetone has evaporated, quickly place the flask into an ice bath to liquefy the gas. 7) Weigh the flask with the liquefied acetone. Subtract the weight of empty flask from this value
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/10/2011 for the course PHIL 160 taught by Professor Coakley during the Spring '11 term at Arizona.

Page1 / 5

Chem Lab 4 - Gas Law Lab Joshua Wexler Abstract In this...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online