sap-on-google-cloud-disaster-recovery-strategies.pdf - SAP...

This preview shows page 1 - 5 out of 13 pages.

SAP on Google Cloud: Disaster-recovery strategies Overview © 2020 Google LLC. All rights reserved.
Contents About this document 3 Introduction 3 Disaster recovery 3 Architecture considerations 4 Disaster-recovery strategies 5 Scenario 1: RTO within days, RPO dependent on business function 6 Scenario 2: RTO less than a day, RPO within minutes 7 Scenario 3: RTO in minutes, RPO close to zero 9 Disaster-recovery planning and testing 11 Recommendations 11 Capacity planning 11 Automation 12 Disaster-recovery plan 12 Summary 12 Further reading 13 2 © 2020 Google LLC. All rights reserved.
About this document This document is part of a series about working with SAP on Google Cloud. The series includes the following documents: High availability Migration strategies Backup strategies and solutions Disaster-recovery strategies (this document) Introduction This document helps architects to make smart decisions when designing disaster-recovery (DR) architectures and strategies. The document considers not just the criticality of individual solutions, but also the different components of a typical SAP system. A good disaster-recovery strategy begins with a business impact analysis that defines two key metrics: Recovery Time Objective ( RTO ) : How long you can afford to have your business offline. Recovery Point Objective ( RPO ) : How much data loss you can sustain before you run into compliance issues due to financial losses. For both cases, you must determine the costs to your business while the system is offline or for data loss and re-creation. Typically, the smaller your RTO and RPO values are (that is, the faster your application must recover from an interruption), the more your application will cost to run. Because smaller RTO and RPO values often mean greater complexity, the associated administrative overhead also increases with lower RTO and RPO values. Disaster recovery Disaster recovery involves a set of policies, tools, and procedures to enable the recovery or continuation of vital technology infrastructure and systems following a natural or human-induced disaster. Disaster recovery focuses on the technology systems that support critical business functions, as opposed to business continuity, which involves keeping all essential aspects of a business functioning despite significant disruptive events. Disaster recovery can therefore be considered as a subset of business continuity. 3 © 2020 Google LLC. All rights reserved.
When a primary site that hosts mission-critical technical infrastructure becomes completely unavailable, that is considered a disaster . It's important to consider the probability that a disaster might occur with or without warning because some steps, such as relying on completion of replicas, depend on whether a disaster occurs with warning. In all cases, you need to maintain full access to the disaster-recovery systems both for users and any other systems interacting with the DR system. You also need to ensure that enough capacity is available at the disaster-recovery site.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture