OUTLINE � Modules 10

OUTLINE � Modules 10 - OUTLINE Modules 10, 11, 12 13...

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OUTLINE – Modules 10, 11, 12 13 SENSATION 1. Sensation vs. Perception 2. Psychophysics 3. Vision 4. Audition **NOTE: Read carefully about structure and function of the EYE, Read about Touch, Taste, Smell, Balance PERCEPTION 5. Organization and Interpretation Some Perceptual Illusions Gestalt Psychology Constancy in Perception Perceptual Set Depth Perception Perceptual Adaptation Extra Sensory Perception
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Experiencing events: 2 Stages Stage 1 SENSATION: the processes of : converting the physical world into a mental representation (transduction) Relaying that information to the brain (Conduction) transduction: variations of light --> experience of color variations of air pressure--> experience of sound Stage 2: PERCEPTION the processes of: selection, organization and interpretation EX: we can recognize the color green we can distinguish btw. Bach and Britney Spears PSYCHOPHYSICS: The study of the relationship between physical characteristics of stimuli (energy) --> and our psychological experience of them
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EX: Light -->Brightness Sound --> Volume Key concepts: Absolute Thresholds: smallest magnitude of a stimulus that can be rapidly discriminated from NO stimulus at least 50% of the time Difference Threshold: minimum difference between two stimuli that a person can detect 50% of the time Just noticeable difference Signal Detection Theory: predicts how and when we will detect the presence of a stimulus amidst background stimulation complex decision mechanisms are involved to determine if a stimulus exists Based on both: stimulus strength our experience: expectations, motivation, level of fatigue -sounds in my house Point: Absolute thresholds and Just noticeable differences are not fixed - our sensitivity to a stimulus varies based on experiences Factors that affect Absolute and Difference Thresholds: 1) chance variation- noise in the system influences
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sensitivity (rub your eye, light pattern is actually noise) (you think you hear your name, but you don't) (feel a limb that is not there) 2) stimulus intensity- Weber’s Law : the greater the intensity of a stimulus, the larger the difference must be in order to detect a difference -they must differ by a constant proportion 3) Sensory Adaptation- Our sensitivity to an unchanging stimulus diminishes VISION Q: How do we turn light energy (physical stimulus) into vision (psychological experience)? 2 aspects of light energy are crucial: Wavelength - the distance between the peaks of light waves corresponds to our sensation of color R O Y G B I V long wavelength--------------------------------------->short Amplitude the intensity of the light wave corresponds to our sensation of the brightness small-->dull great--> bright Read module 11 VISION: Structure of the eye
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This note was uploaded on 10/19/2011 for the course PSYCH 100 taught by Professor Cave during the Fall '08 term at UMass (Amherst).

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OUTLINE � Modules 10 - OUTLINE Modules 10, 11, 12 13...

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