45249 agfood w11 - 1
 02‐4 5‐2 49
 02­45­249:
Political
Economy
of
Agriculture
and
Food


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Unformatted text preview: 1
 02‐4 5‐2 49
 02­45­249:
Political
Economy
of
Agriculture
and
Food
 Dr.
Jamey
Essex
/
Winter
2011
/
T&Th
10:00­11:20
am
/
Toldo
200
 Office:
1139
Chrysler
Hall
North
/
Office
hours:
T
1:00‐3:00pm,
W
10:00am‐12:00pm
 Email:[email protected]/
Phone:
519‐253‐3000
ext
2358
 
 Course
description
 The
worlds
of
food
production,
exchange,
and
consumption
ar e
under goi ng
dramatic
shifts
at
scales
 from
the
body
to
the
glob al.

Perusing
the
shelves
at
Wester n‐style
grocery
stores
around
the
wor ld,
 consumers
have
a
vastly
expanded
range
of
choices,
including
many
foods
produced
i n
exotic
 locales
and
that
were
out
of
reach
less
than
a
generation
ago.

At
the
same
ti me,
hunger
conti nues
to
 haunt
lar ge
number s
of
people
in
b oth
the
developi ng
and
developed
worlds,
while
small
and
 sub sistence
f ar mer s
find
i t
har der
to
sustain
livelihoods
amid
i ntense
inter national
market
 competition.

This
cour se
critically
examines
shifts
i n
the
political
economy
of
agriculture
and
food,
 focusi ng
on
the
political,
economic,
social,
and
geogr aphic
changes
occurri ng
i n
agro‐food
 production
and
consumption
systems.

Analyzing
agricultur e
and
f ood
through
the
examination
of
 political
and
economic
structur es,
institutions,
and
practices,
this
cour se
focuses
on
the
connections
 between
people,
places,
and
processes,
and
the
ways
in
which
one
of
the
most
basic
of
human
needs
 is
(and
i s
not)
met.

We
will
approach
these
i ssues
through
readings
drawn
from
fields
such
as
 geography,
political
science,
political
ecology,
agro‐f ood
studies,
r ural
sociology,
and
development
 studies.


 
 Course
goals
and
learning
outcomes
 The
goals
of
this
cour se
ar e:
 To
intr oduce
students
to
major
i ssues,
concepts,
deb ates,
and
case
studies
i n
the
study
of
the
 political
economy
of
agriculture
and
food.
 To
intr oduce
students
to
inter disciplinary
modes
of
analysis
and
explanation.
 To
help
students
develop
skills
in
critical
thi nking,
r eading,
writi ng,
and
analysis.
 To
facilitate
self‐directed
learning
and
political
li ter acy
beyond
the
classr oom.
 
 At
the
conclusion
of
this
cour se,
successful
students
will
b e
ab le
to:
 Under stand
the
significance
of
inter disciplinar y
approaches
i n
analyzi ng
and
explaining
the
 political
economy
of
agriculture
and
food.
 Identify,
explain,
and
use
major
concepts
and
deb ates
related
to
the
study
of
agricultur e
and
 food
from
a
political
economy
per spective.
 For mulate
questions
and
strategies
appropriate
to
r esearch
on
political
economic
issues
related
 to
agricultur e
and
food.
 Demonstrate
enhanced
political
literacy
and
engage
mor e
effectively
in
the
political,
economic,
 and
social
life
of
their
communities.
 
 Required
readings
 There
i s
one
req uired
boo k
for
this
cour se,
Tony
Weis’
The
Global
Food
E conomy:
The
Battle
for
the
 Future
of
Farming
(Fer nwood
Press,
2007),
available
at
the
universi ty
bookstore
and
onli ne.

All
 other 
readings
are
found
in
the
co urseware
pack age,
avai lab le
at
the
Document
I maging
Center
in
 CHT
101,
or
will
be
made
avai lable
onli ne.
Some
of
the
readings
are
difficult,
but
we
wi ll
di scuss
 them
i n
class
and
it
is
essential
that
you
r ead
them
f or
a
full
understanding
of
the
concepts,
cases,
 and
themes
of
the
cour se.
 Wi nter
2011
 2
 02‐4 5‐2 49
 Assignments
and
grades
 Your
gr ade
in
this
cour se
i s
based
on
four
components,
listed
below.

The
midter m
and
fi nal
exams
 will
b e
a
mix
of
identification,
defi nition,
shor t
answer
and
essay
q uestions.
The
two
shor t
paper
 assignments
will
b e
di scussed
i n
mor e
detail
in
class.
 
 Assignment
#1
(10 %)
–
due
in
class
o n
Feb
8
 Midterm
ex am
(40 %)
–
in
class
o n
Mar
1
 Assignment
#2
(10 %)
–
due
in
class
o n
Mar
24
 Final
ex am
(40 %)
–
Apr
9
at
12:00
noon
(ro om
TBA)
 
 During
the
final
two
weeks
of
the
ter m,
I
will
give
out
the
Student
Evaluation
of
Teaching
(SET)
 forms
in
class
and
you
will
be
ab le
to
evaluate
your
experience
and
my
teaching
in
thi s
course.
 
 Grade
scheme
 A+
 93. 0
 – 
 10 0 
 
 B ‐
 
 70.0
–
72.9
 
 D
 53.0
–
56.9
 A
 86.0
–
92.9
 
 C+

 67.0
–
69.9
 
 D‐ 
 50.0
–
52.9
 A‐

 80.0
–
85.9
 
 C

 63.0
–
66.9
 
 F

 35.0
–
49.9
 B +
 
 77.0
–
79.9
 
 C‐

 60.0
–
62.9
 
 F‐

 0.0
–
34.9
 B 

 73.0
–
76.9

 
 D+ 
 57.0
–
59.9
 
 Late
Policy
 Work
is
to
be
tur ned
in
on
ti me.
If
you
must
miss
an
exam
or
tur n
in
an
assignment
late,
you
need
to
 contact
me
b eforehand
or
as
soon
as
possible
afterward
(i.e.,
within
24
hour s)
to
let
me
k now.
I
only
 per mit
makeup
exams
due
to
emergency
or
illness,
and
you
will
need
to
provide
me
with
a
valid
 doctor’s
note
or
some
other
for mal
documentation.

Makeup
exams
will
be
different
from
those
 given
during
the
r egularly
scheduled
ti me.

Late
wor k
will
b e
mark ed
off
20%
of
the
to tal
possib le
 marks
per
day
it
is
late.

Questions
or
prob lems
regardi ng
specific
mark s
should
be
br ought
to
me
 no
later
than
one
week
from
when
marks
are
delivered
in
class.

 
 Email
and
office
hours
 I
have
regular
office
hours
on
Tuesday
from
1
to
3
pm,
and
on
Wednesday
from
10
am
to
12
noon.
 My
office
is
located
i n
1139
Chrysler
Hall
Nor th.
If
you
need
to
see
me
but
are
unable
to
make
i t
to
 my
office
hours,
please
contact
me
by
email
or
phone
and
we
can
arr ange
a
suitable
alter native
 meeti ng
ti me.

As
a
gener al
r ule,
I
try
to
r eply
to
emails
sent
to
me
within
two
days
of
r eceiving
 them.

If
you
emai l
me
and
do
not
receive
a
reply
wi thin
48
hour s,
assume
that
I
did
not
receive
 your
email,
and
try
again.

I
do
no t
provide
grades
via
email.

P lease
see
me
duri ng
office
hours
or
 check
the
cour se
CLEW
site.

N ote
that
the
universi ty’s
email
policy
states
that
students
must
use
 their
UWindsor
emai l
accounts
to
communicate
wi th
faculty.

I
also
request
that
you
use
 appropriate
etiquette
when
communicating
with
me
via
email
–
I
will
not
reply
to
emai ls
from
 inter net‐based
email
progr ams,
or
to
emails
lacking
a
subject
li ne,
a
greeting,
or
your
name.
 
 Classroom
etiquetteand
academic
dishonesty
 Consi stent
wi th
Univer sity
of
Windsor
policy,
cheati ng,
plagiarism,
and
other
for ms
of
academic
 dishonesty
are
no t
tolerated.

Academic
dishonesty
includes
turni ng
i n
written
work
that
is
not
 your
own,
pur posefully
f ailing
to
provide
adequate
or
full
citations,
and
fei gni ng
i llness
to
avoid
 turni ng
i n
work
on
ti me.

Those
caught
cheating
or
plagi arizing
will
r eceive
a
zero 
on
the
 assignment
and
will
not
be
allowed
to
redo
the
wor k.
Tur nitin®
may
be
used
for
some
or
all
 student
paper s
in
thi s
cour se,
as
the
case
may
be,
at
the
i nstructor’s
di scretion.
You
may
be
asked
to
 sub mit
your
paper
in
electr onic
for m
directly
to
Tur nitin®.

Please
see
the
attached
sheet
for
the
 Wi nter
2011
 3
 02‐4 5‐2 49
 official
Univer sity
policy.

If
you
feel
you
need
help
with
the
materials,
please
see
me,
or
one
of
the
 graduate
assistants.
 
 In
class,
you
are
expected
to
respect
other s’
right
to
lear n
and
discuss
cour se
materials
in
a
safe
and
 comfortable
environment.
You
should
rely
on
facts,
reason,
and
evidence
to
b ack
ar guments,
and
 overtly
raci st,
sexist,
or
other wise
inflammatory
remarks
will
not
be
tolerated.

I
am
very
open
 about
my
own
political
views,
and
I
encourage
open
debate
and
exchange
of
ideas.
 
 Students
with
learning/physical
differences
 If
you
have
a
lear ning
or
physical
difference,
please
obtai n
the
appropriate
paperwork
from
the
 Univer sity
and
let
me
k now
as
soon
as
possible
so
that
any
necessary
arrangements
can
b e
made.
 
 Course
expectations
 You
should
treat
this
cour se
syllabus
as
a
sor t
of
contract.

Given
this,
I
want
to
outline
very
clearly
 what
I
expect
of
you
and
what
you
should
expect
of
me
in
this
cour se.
 
 I
expect
that
you
will:
 Attend
class
regularly
(i.e.,
every
day),
arrive
on
ti me,
and
do
all
r equired
reading;
 Pay
attention,
tur n
off
your
cell
phone,
refrai n
from
distr acti ng
your self
and
your
classmates,
 and
use
your
laptop
only
for
class‐related
activities;
 Approach
the
course
materials
with
an
open
mind
and
a
serious
attitude;
 Strictly
adhere
to
the
student
code
of
conduct
and
observe
the
Univer sity’s
policies
r egarding
 academic
honesty;
 Respect
your
fellow
students’
ri ght
to
learn
in
a
safe
and
hospitable
classr oom;
 Respect
and
take
advantage
of
my
office
hours,
parti cular ly
if
you
are
falli ng
b ehind
or
having
 difficulty
with
the
material;
 Under stand
that
grades
refer 
to
the
quality
and
pr ecision
of
the
work 
gr aded,
not
to
your
need
 for
a
particular
grade
or
to
an
open‐ended
negotiati on
between
you
and
me.
 
 For
my
par t,
you
can
expect
that
I
wi ll:
 Arrive
to
class
on
ti me
and
well‐prepared
to
lecture
and
f acilitate
discussion;
 Complete
the
gr ading
of
exams
and
assi gnments
in
a
timely
f ashion;
 Reply
to
emails
in
a
ti mely
fashion,
usually
wi thin
two
days;
 Be
available
during
my
scheduled
office
hours,
and
will
r e‐schedule
them
if
necessary
(i.e.,
I
 won’t
cancel
them
without
making
them
up
at
some
other 
ti me);
 Take
your
questionsand
ideas
seriously,
so
long
as
they
ar e
relevant
to
the
material;
 Maintain
a
relaxed
but
professional
classr oom
space
for
learning
and
discussion;
 Treat
all
students
eq uitab ly
wi th
regar d
to
gr ading
and
class
discussion.
 
 Wi nter
2011
 4
 02‐4 5‐2 49
 Course
Schedule
 
 Jan
6:
Introductio ns
 No
reading
 
 Jan
11 
 /13:
Worlds
of
fo od
and
agriculture
 Weis
(2007),
Chapter
1:
“The
global
food
economy:
contradictions
and
crises.”
 Morgan,
K.,
T.
Mar sden,
J.
Murdoch.

(2006)

“N etworks,
Conventions,
and
Regions:
Theorizi ng
 ‘Worlds
of
Food’.”

Chapter
1
i n
World s
of
Food:
Place,
Powe r,
and
Prove nance
in
the
Food
Chain.

 Oxfor d:
Oxford
Univer sity
Press,
7‐25.
 
 Jan
18/2 0:
Industrializ atio n
of
agriculture
 Weis
(2007),
Chapter
2:
“The
temper ate
gr ain‐livestock
complex.”
 Manning,
R.

(2004)

“The
Oil
We
Eat:
Following
the
food
chain
b ack
to
Iraq .”

Harper’s
 Magazine,
308
(1845):
37‐47.
 Brookfield,
H.

(2008)

“Family
Far ms
Are
Sti ll
Around:
Ti me
to
Inver t
the
Old
Agr arian
 Question.”

Geog raphy
Compass,
2
(1):
108‐126.
 
 Jan
25/2 7:
Agricultural
lab or
 McWilli ams,
C.

(1935
[1999])

“Introduction”
and
“The
Trend
towar d
Stabili zation.”

Chapter s
1
 and
16
i n
Factories
in
t he
Field:
The
Story
of
Mig ratory
Farm
Labor
in
California.
Berkeley:
 Univer sity
of
Califor nia
Press,
3‐10
and
283‐304.
 Steinbeck,
J.

(1939)

The
Grapes
of
Wrath
(Chapter s
19,
21,
and
25).

New
York:
Pengui n,
297‐ 308,
362‐365,
and
445‐449.
 Basok ,
T.

(2002)

“Captive
Labour.”

Chapter
7
in
Tortillas
and
Tomatoes:
Transmigrant
Mexican
 Harve sters
in
Canad a.

Montreal
and
Ki ngston:
McGill‐Queen’s
University
Press,
106‐128.
 
 Feb
1/3:
The
Green
Revo lutio n
 Weis
(2007),
Chapter
3:
“Fr om
coloniali sm
to
glob al
market
integr ation
in
the
South.”
 Borlaug,
N.E.

(2000)

The
Green
Revolut ion
Revisited 
and
the
Road
Ahead.
Special
30th
 Anniver sary
Lecture,
The
Nor wegian
Nobel
Institute,
Oslo,
Norway,
Sept
8,
2000.
(Not
in
CW
–
 on
CLEW
and
at
http://nob elprize.or g/nob el_pri zes/peace/ar ticles/borlaug/index.html.)
 
 Feb
8/10:
Biotechnolo gy
 Kloppenburg,
R.J.,
Jr.

(2003)

“Sti ll
the
seed:
plant
bi otechnology
in
the
twenty‐first
century.”

 Chapter
11
in
First
the
Seed:
The
Political
E conomy
of
Plant
Biotechnology
(2nd
ed.).

Madison,
WI:
 Univer sity
of
Wisconsi n
Press,
291‐354.
 Feb
8:
Assignment
#1
due
in
class
 
 Feb
15/1 7:
Food
and
the
internatio nal
system

 Weis
(2007),
Chapter
4:
“Entrenchi ng
an
uneven
playing
field:
the
multilateral
regulation
of
 agricultur e.”
 Friedmann,
H.

(2005)

“Feeding
the
Empire:
P athologies
of
Globalized
Agriculture.”

In
L.
 Panitch
and
C.
Leys
(eds.),
Socialist
Reg iste r
2005:
The
Empire
Reloaded.

Monmouth,
UK:
Merli n
 Press,
124‐143.
 
 Feb
22/2 4:
No
class
–
Reading
week
 No
reading
 
 Wi nter
2011
 5
 02‐4 5‐2 49
 Mar
1:
Midterm
exam
 No
reading
 
 Mar
3/8:
Hunger,
foo d
security,
foo d
aid
 Jarosz,
L.

(2009)

“Ener gy,
Cli mate
Change,
Meat,
and
Mark ets:
Mapping
the
Coor dinates
of
the
 Current
World
Food
Cri sis.”

Geog raphy
Compass,
3
(6):
2065‐2083.
 Barrett,
C.B .
and
D.G.
Maxwell.

(2005)

“Introduction”
and
“The
basics
of
food
aid.”

Intro
and
 Chapter
1
i n
Food
Aid
Afte r
Fifty
Years:
Re cast ing
its
role.

London:
Routledge,
1‐17.
 Food
and
Agriculture
Or ganization
of
the
United
Nations.

(2010)

The
State
of
Food
Inse curity
in
 the
World:
Add ressing
food
inse curity
in
protracted
crises.

Rome:
FAO.

(N ot
i n
CW
–
availab le
on
 CLEW
and
online
at
www.f ao.org/docrep/013/i1683e/i1683e.pdf)
 
 Mar
10:
Foo d
pro cessing
and
retailing
 Patel,
R.

(2007)

“Checking
out
of
Super markets.”

Chapter
8
in
Stuffed
and
Starved:
Market s,
 Powe r
and
t he
Hidden
Battle
for
the
World’ s
Food
System.

Tor onto:
Har per
Collins,
215‐252.
 
 Mar
15/17:
Ecolo gical
and
public
health
 Du
Puis,
E.M.

(2007)

“Angels
and
Vegetab les:
A
Brief
History
of
Food
Advice
in
America.”

 Gast ronomica:
The
Journal
of
Food
and
Culture,
7
(3):
34‐44.
 Guthman,
J.

(2004)

“Or ganic
Far ming:
Ideal
Pr actices
and
Practical
Ideals.”

Chapter
3
in
 Ag rarian
Dreams:
The
Paradox
of
Organic
Farming
in
California.

Berk eley:
Univer sity
of
 California
Pr ess,
42‐60.
 
 Mar
22/24:
Food
q uality
and
co nsumer
politics
 Freidber g,
S.

(2009)

“Milk:
Border
Poli tics.”

Chapter
6
in
Fresh:
A
Pe rishable
History.

 Cambridge,
MA:
Belknap
Pr ess,
197‐234.
 Schlosser,
E.

(2001)

“Epilogue:
have
it
your
way.”

I n
Fast
Food
Nation:
The
Dark
Side
of
the
All­ American
Meal.

N ew
York:
Harper
Collins,
255‐270.
 March
24:
Assignment
#2 
due
in
class
 
 Mar
29/31:
Glob al
meets
lo cal
 Weis
(2007),
Chapter
5:
“The
battle
for
the
f utur e
of
farmi ng.”
 Barham,
E.

(2003)

“Translating
terr oir:
the
glob al
challenge
of
Fr ench
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 Wi nter
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 ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/07/2011 for the course POLI SCI 45-249 taught by Professor Essex during the Winter '11 term at Windsor.

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