45356 ipe theory w11

45356 ipe theory w11 - 1
 02‐4 5‐3 56


Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 1
 02‐4 5‐3 56
 02­45­356:
Theories
of
International
Political
Economy
 Dr.
Jamey
Essex
/
Winter
2011
/
T
4:00­6:50
pm
/
CHN
G125
 Office:
1139
Chrysler
Hall
North
/
Office
hours:
T
1:00‐3:00pm,
W
10:00am‐12:00pm
 Email:
jessex@uwindsor.ca
/
Phone:
519‐253‐3000
ext
2358
 
 Course
description
 This
course
provides
an
examination
of
major
theor etical
perspectives
on
international
political
 economy,
and
cover s
both
classical
and
modern
theories,
includi ng
mercanti lism,
liber alism,
 neoliberalism,
Mar xism,
femini sm
and
post‐modernism.

We
will
concentrate
on
the
major
 theor etical
per spectives,
especially
as
these
r elate
to
complex
and
contradictory
processes
of
 glob ali zation
and
development,
which
are
tied
to
changes
in
global
political
economy,
and
ar e
often
 described
and
analyzed
through
theories
ab out
political
economy.
We
wi ll
approach
the
issues
and
 concepts
fr om
the
understandi ng
that
the
processes,
flows,
materials,
structures,
and
ideologies
 that
constitute
international
political
economy
–
as
competing
theor etical
framework s,
an
academic
 field,
and
the
material
pr actices
and
di scourses
of
everyday
life
–
ar e
fundamentally
geographic,
 highly
contested,
and
i nextricab ly
tied
to
how
we
define
the
social
good.
 
 Course
goals
and
learning
outcomes
 The
goals
of
this
cour se
ar e:
 To
provi de
students
an
i n‐depth
examination
of
the
details
and
ar guments
of
the
major
theories
 in
the
field
of
inter national
political
economy.
 To
help
students
develop
skills
in
critical
thi nking,
writing,
and
analysi s.
 To
facilitate
self‐directed
learning
and
political
li ter acy
beyond
the
classr oom.
 
 At
the
conclusion
of
this
cour se,
successful
students
will
b e
ab le
to:
 Identify
and
explain
b asic
i deas,
concepts,
and
ar guments
associated
with
the
major 
theoretical
 perspectives
on
inter national
poli tical
economy.
 Under stand
what
theory
is
and
its
relationship
to
political
and
economic
practice.
 Recognize
and
di scuss
ar guments
about
globali zation,
development,
and
poli tical
economic
 change
relative
to
the
theories
that
infor m
them.
 Demonstrate
i mproved
abili ty
to
read,
under stand,
and
discuss
complex
material
orally
and
in
 writing.
 Demonstrate
increased
political
liter acy
and
engage
mor e
effectively
in
the
political,
economic,
 and
social
life
of
their
communities.
 
 Required
readings
 The
req uired
readi ngs
for
this
cour se
consi st
of
one
book,
ti tled
Theories
of
Development:
 Conte ntions,
Arg ume nts,
Alte rnat ives
(2nd
ed),
by
Richard
P eet
and
Elaine
Hartwick
(2009,
Gui lford
 Press),
availab le
at
the
univer sity
b ook store
and
thr ough
online
retailer s
such
as
Amazon.ca,
and
 additi onal
readings
in
a
CourseWare,
available
for
purchase
in
the
Document
I magi ng
Center
(CHT
 101).

The
readi ng
i s
not
especially
heavy,
b ut
it
is
fairly
difficult,
and
i t
is
e sse ntial
that
you
keep
up
 with
the
assigned
reading.
If
you
ar e
unwilling
or
unable
to
do
the
r equired
reading,
you
may
want
 to
reconsider
taki ng
thi s
class.
 
 Assignments
and
grades
 Your
gr ade
in
this
cour se
will
be
based
on
three
components:
 
 Wi nter
2011
 2
 02‐4 5‐3 56
 
 Two
shor t
papers
(20%
each,
40%
total):
You
will
have
two
short
paper s
duri ng
the
ter m,
 based
on
specific
questions
about
the
reading;
these
are
due
Feb
15
and
Mar
15.
 
 Take‐home
fi nal
exam
(50%):
I
will
give
you
an
essay‐for mat
tak e
home
exam,
which
you
will
 hand
in
to
me
at
my
office
b y
the
end
of
the
scheduled
final
exam
time,
which
i s
5:30
pm
on
 Tuesday,
Apr
19.
 Participation
(10%):
Your
partici pati on
mark
will
b e
based
on
several
in‐class
exercises
during
 the
cour se
of
the
semester.

I
will
provide
a
detailed
list
of
what
these
will
entail
and
dates
 during
the
first
week
of
the
cour se.
 
 During
the
final
two
weeks
of
the
ter m,
I
will
give
out
the
Student
Evaluation
of
Teaching
(SET)
 forms
in
class
and
you
will
be
ab le
to
evaluate
your
experience
and
my
teaching
in
thi s
course.
 
 Grade
scheme
 A+
 93. 0
 – 
 10 0 
 
 B ‐
 
 70.0
–
72.9
 
 D
 53.0
–
56.9
 A
 86.0
–
92.9
 
 C+

 67.0
–
69.9
 
 D‐ 
 50.0
–
52.9
 A‐

 80.0
–
85.9
 
 C

 63.0
–
66.9
 
 F

 35.0
–
49.9
 B +
 
 77.0
–
79.9
 
 C‐

 60.0
–
62.9
 
 F‐

 0.0
–
34.9
 B 

 73.0
–
76.9

 
 D+ 
 57.0
–
59.9
 
 Late
Policy
 Work
is
to
be
tur ned
in
on
ti me.
If
you
must
miss
a
participation
exer cise
or
turn
i n
an
assi gnment
 late,
you
need
to
contact
me
bef orehand
or
as
soon
as
possible
afterward
(i.e.,
pr eferab ly
wi thin
24
 hour s)
to
let
me
k now.
I
only
per mi t
mak eup
exams
due
to
emer gency
or
illness,
and
you
wi ll
need
 to
provide
me
wi th
a
vali d
doctor ’s
note
or 
some
other
for mal
documentation.

Mak eup
quizzes
will
 be
different
from
those
given
during
the
r egular ly
scheduled
ti me.

Late
work
will
be
marked
off
 20%
of
the
total
possible
marks
per
day
it
is
late.

Questions
or
pr oblems
r egarding
specific
 marks
should
be
br ought
to
me
no
later
than
one
week
from
when
marks
are
deliver ed
i n
class.

 
 Email
and
office
hours
 I
have
regular
office
hours
on
Tuesday
from
1
to
3
pm,
and
on
Wednesday
from
10
am
to
12
noon.
 My
office
is
located
i n
1139
Chrysler
Hall
Nor th.
If
you
need
to
see
me
but
are
unable
to
make
i t
to
 my
office
hours,
please
contact
me
by
email
or
phone
and
we
can
arr ange
a
suitable
alter native
 meeti ng
ti me.

As
a
gener al
r ule,
I
try
to
r eply
to
emails
sent
to
me
within
two
days
of
r eceiving
 them.

If
you
emai l
me
and
do
not
receive
a
reply
wi thin
48
hour s,
assume
that
I
did
not
receive
 your
email,
and
try
again.

I
do
no t
provide
grades
via
email.

P lease
see
me
duri ng
office
hours
or
 check
the
cour se
CLEW
site.

N ote
that
the
universi ty’s
email
policy
states
that
students
must
use
 their
UWindsor
emai l
accounts
to
communicate
wi th
faculty.

I
also
request
that
you
use
 appropriate
etiquette
when
communicating
with
me
via
email
–
I
will
not
reply
to
emai ls
from
 inter net‐based
email
progr ams,
or
to
emails
lacking
a
subject
li ne,
a
greeting,
or
your
name.
 
 Classroom
etiquette
and
academic
dishonesty
 Consi stent
wi th
Univer sity
of
Windsor
policy,
cheati ng,
plagiarism,
and
other
for ms
of
academic
 dishonesty
are
no t
tolerated.

Academic
dishonesty
includes
turni ng
i n
written
work
that
is
not
 your
own,
pur posefully
f ailing
to
provide
adequate
or
full
citations,
and
fei gni ng
i llness
to
avoid
 turni ng
i n
work
on
ti me.

Those
caught
cheating
or
plagi arizing
will
r eceive
a
zero 
on
the
 assignment
and
will
not
be
allowed
to
redo
the
wor k.
Tur nitin®
may
be
used
for
some
or
all
 student
paper s
in
thi s
cour se,
as
the
case
may
be,
at
the
i nstructor’s
di scretion.
You
may
be
asked
to
 Wi nter
2011
 3
 02‐4 5‐3 56
 sub mit
your
paper
in
electr onic
for m
directly
to
Tur nitin®.

Please
see
the
attached
sheet
for
the
 official
Univer sity
policy.

If
you
feel
you
need
help
with
the
materials,
please
see
me.
 
 In
class,
you
are
expected
to
respect
other s’
right
to
lear n
and
discuss
cour se
materials
in
a
safe
and
 comfortable
environment.
You
should
rely
on
facts,
reason,
and
evidence
to
b ack
ar guments,
and
 overtly
raci st,
sexist,
or
other wise
inflammatory
remarks
will
not
be
tolerated.

I
am
very
open
 about
my
own
political
views,
and
I
encourage
open
debate
and
exchange
of
ideas.
 
 Students
with
learning/physical
differences
 If
you
have
a
lear ning
or
physical
difference,
please
obtai n
the
appropriate
paperwork
from
the
 Univer sity
and
let
me
k now
as
soon
as
possible
so
that
any
necessary
arrangements
can
b e
made.
 
 Course
expectations
 You
should
treat
this
cour se
syllabus
as
a
sor t
of
contract.

Given
this,
I
want
to
outline
very
clearly
 what
I
expect
of
you
and
what
you
should
expect
of
me
in
this
cour se.
 
 I
expect
that
you
will:
 Attend
class
regularly
(i.e.,
every
day),
arrive
on
ti me,
and
do
all
r equired
reading;
 Pay
attention,
tur n
off
your
cell
phone,
refrai n
from
distr acti ng
your self
and
your
classmates,
 and
use
your
laptop
only
for
class‐related
activities;
 Approach
the
course
materials
with
an
open
mind
and
a
serious
attitude;
 Strictly
adhere
to
the
student
code
of
conduct
and
observe
the
Univer sity’s
policies
r egarding
 academic
honesty;
 Respect
your
fellow
students’
ri ght
to
learn
in
a
safe
and
hospitable
classr oom;
 Respect
and
take
advantage
of
my
office
hours,
parti cular ly
if
you
are
falli ng
b ehind
or
having
 difficulty
with
the
material;
 Under stand
that
grades
refer 
to
the
quality
and
pr ecision
of
the
work 
gr aded,
not
to
your
need
 for
a
particular
grade
or
an
open‐ended
negotiation
between
you
and
me.
 
 For
my
par t,
you
can
expect
that
I
wi ll:
 Arrive
to
class
on
ti me
and
well‐prepared
to
lecture
and
f acilitate
discussion;
 Complete
the
gr ading
of
exams
and
assi gnments
in
a
timely
f ashion;
 Reply
to
emails
in
a
ti mely
fashion,
usually
wi thin
two
days;
 Be
available
during
my
scheduled
office
hours,
and
will
r e‐schedule
them
if
necessary
(i.e.,
I
 won’t
cancel
them
without
making
them
up
at
some
other 
ti me);
 Take
your
questions
and
ideas
seriously,
so
long
as
they
ar e
relevant
to
the
material;
 Maintain
a
relaxed
but
professional
classr oom
space
for
learning
and
discussion;
 Treat
all
students
eq uitab ly
wi th
regar d
to
gr ading
and
class
discussion.
 
 Wi nter
2011
 4
 02‐4 5‐3 56
 Course
Schedule
 
 Jan
11:
Introductio ns
and
expectations
 Peet
and
Hartwick,
chapter
1
(pp
1‐19)
 
 
 Jan
18:
Liberalism
I
–
Origins
and
classical
liberalism
 Peet
and
Hartwick,
chapter
2
(pp
21‐52)
 Smith,
Adam.

(1776
[2003])

“Of
the
Division
of
Lab our,”
“Of
the
Principle
which
gives
Occasion
 to
the
Divi sion
of
Labour ,”
and
“That
the
Division
of
Labour
is
li mited
by
the
Extent
of
the
 Market.”

B ook
1,
Chapters
1‐3
in
The
Wealth
of
Nations.

New
York:
B antam
Dell,
9‐32.
 
 
 Jan
25:
Liberalism
II
–
from
Keynesianism
to
neo liberalism

 Peet
and
Hartwick,
chapter
3
(pp
53‐102)
 Keynes,
John
Maynard.

(1933)

“From
Keynes
to
Roosevelt:
Our
Recovery
P lan
Assayed.”
Ne w
 York
Time s,
December
31,
1933:
XX2.

 Friedman,
Milton
and
Rose
Friedman.
(1979)
“The
P ower
of
the
Mark et.”
Chapter
1
i n
Free
to
 Choose:
A
Pe rsonal
Statement.

New
York
and
London:
Harcour t
Brace
Jovanovich,
9‐37.
 
 
 Feb
1:
Liberalism
III
–
Modernization
theory
and
the
Washingto n
Co nsensus
 Peet
and
Hartwick,
chapter
4
(pp
103‐142)
 Williamson,
John.

(2008)

“A
Short
History
of
the
Washi ngton
Consensus.”
I n
N arcis
Serr a
and
 Joseph
E.
Sti glitz
(eds.),
The
Washington
Consensus
R econside red:
Towards
a
New
Global
 Gove rnance.

Oxf ord:
Oxfor d
Univer sity
Pr ess,
14‐30.
 Sti glitz,
Joseph
E.

(2007)

“Globali sm’s
Di scontents.”

In
Davi d
B.
Grusky
and
Szonja
Szelényi
 (eds.),
The
Ine quality
Reade r:
Conte mporary
and
Foundational
Read ing s
in
Race,
Class,
and
 Gende r.

B oulder ,
CO:
Westview
Pr ess,
576‐584.
 
 
 Feb
8:
Between
lib eralism
and
…
so mething
else
 Polanyi,
Kar l.

(1944
[2001])

“The
Hundr ed
Y ear s’
P eace”
and

“Conservative
Twenties,
 Revoluti onar y
Thirties.”

Chapters
1
and
2
in
The
Great
Transformation:
The
Political
and
 Economic
Orig ins
of
Our
Time.

Boston:
Beacon
Press,
3‐32.

 Johnson,
Chalmers.

(2007)

“Repub lic
or
Empire:
A
National
Intelligence
Esti mate
on
the
United
 States.”

Harper’s
Magazine ,
January
2007,
314
(1880):
63‐69.
 
 
 Feb
15:
The
b asics
of
Marx ism
 Peet
and
Hartwick,
chapter
5
(pp
143‐196)
 Marx,
Karl.

(1891
[1978])

“Wage
Labour 
and
Capital.”

In
Rober t
C.
Tucker
(ed.),
The
Marx­ Engels
Reade r,
2nd
ed.
New
York:
W.W.
Nor ton
and
Company,
203‐217.
 Paper
#1
due
in
class
 
 
 Feb
22:
Reading
week
 No
class,
no
r eading
 
 Wi nter
2011
 5
 02‐4 5‐3 56
 Mar
1:
Variants
of
Marx ism
–
World
systems
theory
and
regulation
theory
 Knox,
P aul,
John
Agnew,
and
Linda
McCar thy.

(2008)

“Geogr aphical
dynamics
of
the
world
 economy.”

Chapter
3
in
The
Geog raphy
of
the
World 
Economy
(5th
ed.).

London:
Hodder ,
56‐89.
 Peck,
Jamie.

(2000)

“P laces
of
Work .”

In
Eric
Sheppard
and
Tr evor
J.
Bar nes
(eds.),
A
 Companion
to
E conomic
Ge ography.
Oxf ord:
B lack well,
133‐148.
 
 
 Mar
8:
Gramsci,
the
factory,
and
hegemo ny
 Gramsci,
Antonio.

(1971)

“Americani sm
and
Fordism.”

In
Quintin
Hoare
and
Geoffrey
Nowell
 Smith
(eds.),
Sele ctions
from
t he
Prison
Note books.

N ew
York:
International
Pub lishers,
298‐ 318.
 Eugenides,
Jeffrey.

(2002)

Selections
from
M iddle sex.

N ew
York:
Picador
Press.
 
 
 Mar
15:
Struggles
in
the
“real
wo rld”
 In‐class
film:
The
Take
 Paper
#2
due
in
class
 
 
 Mar
22:
Postmodern
and
poststructural
theories
 Peet
and
Hartwick,
chapter
6
(pp
197‐239)
 Hall,
Stuar t.

(1992)

“Di scourse
and
P ower ”
and
“Representing
‘the
Other ’.”

I n
Stuart
Hall
and
 Bram
Gieben
(eds.),
Formations
of
M odernity.

Camb ridge:
P olity
Press,
291‐308.
 
 
 Mar
29:
Feminist
theories
and
wo men’s
work
 Peet
and
Hartwick,
chapter
7
(pp
240‐276)
 In‐class
film:
The
L ife
and
Times
of
R osie
t he
Rivete r
(1980)

 
 
 Apr
5:
Econo mic
alterity
and
diversity
 Peet
and
Hartwick,
chapter
8
(pp
277‐291)
 The
Community
Economi es
Collective.

(2001)

“I maging
and
Enacting
N oncapi tali st
Futures.”

 Socialist
Review,
28
(3/4):
93‐135.

(Ver sion
in
CW
i s
also
free
online
at
 http://www.communi tyeconomi es.or g/papers/rethink/rethinkp2i magi ning31.pdf)
 
 
 Tuesday,
Apr
19,
5:30pm:
Take­ho me
final
ex am
due
 Wi nter
2011
 ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 10/07/2011 for the course POLI SCI 45-356 taught by Professor Essex during the Winter '11 term at Windsor.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online