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45356 ipe theory w11 - 1 0245356:...

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02‐45‐356 Winter 2011 1 02-45-356: Theories of International Political Economy Dr. Jamey Essex / Winter 2011 / T 4:00-6:50 pm / CHN G125 Office: 1139 Chrysler Hall North / Office hours: T 1:00‐3:00pm, W 10:00am‐12:00pm Email: [email protected] / Phone: 519‐253‐3000 ext 2358 Course description This course provides an examination of major theoretical perspectives on international political economy, and covers both classical and modern theories, including mercantilism, liberalism, neoliberalism, Marxism, feminism and post‐modernism. We will concentrate on the major theoretical perspectives, especially as these relate to complex and contradictory processes of globalization and development, which are tied to changes in global political economy, and are often described and analyzed through theories about political economy. We will approach the issues and concepts from the understanding that the processes, flows, materials, structures, and ideologies that constitute international political economy – as competing theoretical frameworks, an academic field, and the material practices and discourses of everyday life – are fundamentally geographic, highly contested, and inextricably tied to how we define the social good. Course goals and learning outcomes The goals of this course are: To provide students an in‐depth examination of the details and arguments of the major theories in the field of international political economy. To help students develop skills in critical thinking, writing, and analysis. To facilitate self‐directed learning and political literacy beyond the classroom. At the conclusion of this course, successful students will be able to: Identify and explain basic ideas, concepts, and arguments associated with the major theoretical perspectives on international political economy. Understand what theory is and its relationship to political and economic practice. Recognize and discuss arguments about globalization, development, and political economic change relative to the theories that inform them. Demonstrate improved ability to read, understand, and discuss complex material orally and in writing. Demonstrate increased political literacy and engage more effectively in the political, economic, and social life of their communities. Required readings The required readings for this course consist of one book , titled Theories of Development: Contentions, Arguments, Alternatives (2 nd ed), by Richard Peet and Elaine Hartwick (2009, Guilford Press), available at the university bookstore and through online retailers such as Amazon.ca, and additional readings in a CourseWare , available for purchase in the Document Imaging Center (CHT 101). The reading is not especially heavy, but it is fairly difficult, and it is essential that you keep up with the assigned reading. If you are unwilling or unable to do the required reading, you may want to reconsider taking this class.
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