45488 588 development w11

45488 588 development w11 - 1
 45‐488/588


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Unformatted text preview: 1
 45‐488/588
 45­488/588:
Development
Challenges
in
the
21st
Century
 Dr.
Jamey
Essex
/
Winter
2011
/
W
2:30­5:20
pm
/
CHN
1137
 Office:
1139
Chrysler
Hall
North
/
Office
hours:
T
1:00‐3:00pm,
W
10:00am‐12:00pm
 Email:
jessex@uwindsor.ca
/
Phone:
519‐253‐3000
ext
2358
 
 Course
description
 This
course
is
a
one‐ti me
special
topics
seminar ,
designed
for
fourth‐year
under graduates
and
 master’s
students,
on
development
challenges
in
the
21st
century.

In
many
ways,
the
challenges
of
 development
have
r emained
stubbor nly
consi stent
–
pover ty
is
as
entrenched
as
ever
i n
many
parts
 of
the
Glob al
South,
almost
a
billion
people
ar e
chronically
hungry,
dozens
of
states
remain
 politically
and
economically
unstab le
or
under
autocratic
regi mes,
and
many
glob al
i nstitutions
 have
fai led
to
adequately
incorpor ate
voices
and
views
from
below.

On
the
other
hand,
a
plethor a
 of
new
actor s
has
emer ged
within
development
practice,
while
new
theories
and
approaches
to
 development
(some
of
which
even
unsettle
the
very
meani ng
and
ob jective
of
development)
have
 come
to
the
for e
wi th
changes
in
global
systems
of
governance,
exchange,
and
culture.

Thi s
course
 will
exami ne
some
of
the
key
contemporary
trends,
ideas,
and
prob lems
within
development
theory
 and
practice,
with
an
eye
toward
how
these
may
develop
in
the
near
future.

As
this
i s
a
mixed
 graduate/
under grad
seminar ,
there
will
be
sli ghtly
different
writi ng
r equirements
for
students
in
 488
and
those
in
588
at
the
end
of
the
ter m.
 
 Course
goals
and
learning
outcomes
 The
goals
of
this
cour se
ar e:
 To
provi de
students
a
thematic
overview
of
major
themes,
deb ates,
and
concepts
r elated
to
the
 contemporary
politics
of
development.
 To
help
students
develop
skills
in
critical
thi nking,
writing,
and
analysi s,
and
to
help
i mprove
 students’
academic
research
skills.
 To
facilitate
self‐directed
learning
and
political
li ter acy
beyond
the
classr oom.
 
 At
the
conclusion
of
this
cour se,
successful
students
will
b e
ab le
to:
 Identify
and
explain
major
themes,
debates,
concepts,
and
ar guments
associated
with
the
 politics
of
development
in
the
current
period.
 Recognize,
di scuss,
and
contribute
to
arguments
ab out
the
poli tics
of
development
with
 consider ation
of
different
points
of
view
and
approaches
to
development.
 Demonstrate
i mproved
abili ty
to
read,
under stand,
and
discuss
complex
material
orally
and
in
 writing,
and
to
carry
out
academic
r esearch.
 Demonstrate
increased
political
liter acy
and
engage
mor e
effectively
in
the
political,
economic,
 and
social
life
of
their
communities.
 
 Required
reading
 Required
reading
for
this
cour se
consi sts
of
five
bo oks,
availab le
at
the
univer sity
book store
or
 onli ne
through
Amazon
or
Chapters.

Some
are
relatively
recent
publications,
so
used
copies
may
 not
be
readily
avai lable.

If
possib le,
I
will
place
copies
of
the
required
texts
on
reserve
at
Leddy
 Library.

Additional
optional
r eadi ngs
may
also
be
placed
on
r eserve
at
Leddy,
in
the
department
 office,
or
electronically.
 
 Mike
Davi s.
(2006)
Planet
of
Slums.

London
and
N ew
York:
Ver so.
 William
Easter ly.

(2006)

The
White
Man’ s
Burde n:
Why
the
West’s
e fforts
t o
aid
the
rest
have
 done
so
much
ill
and
so
little
good .

New
York:
P engui n
Press.
 Wi nter
2011
 2
 45‐488/588
 Victoria
Lawson.

(2007)

Making
Development
Geog raphy.

London:
Hodder
Ar nold.
 Dambisa
Moyo.

(2010)

Dead
Aid:
Why
aid
is
not
working
and
how
the re
is
a
better
way
for
 Africa.

Toronto:
D&M
P ubli sher s
Inc.

[A
2009
har dback
edition
from
Farrar,
Straus
and
Giroux
 is
also
available
wi th
a
different
for ewor d.]
 Ananya
Roy.

(2010)

Poverty
Capital:
Microfinance
and
the
making
of
developme nt.

New
York:
 Routledge.
 
 Assignments
and
grades
 Your
gr ade
in
this
cour se
will
be
based
on
sever al
components,
b ut
assignments
differ
slightly
 depending
on
whether
you
are
enr olled
i n
488
or
588.
 
 Participation
(20%):
P articipation
mark s
are
based
on
the
freq uency
and
(especially)
quality
of
 your
contribution
to
class
discussion
(half
of
the
participation
mark),
and
on
week ly
sub mi ssion
 of
readi ng
q uestions
via
the
cour se
CLEW
site
(the
other
half ,
10
ti mes
at
5
mark s
each).
 Group
presentation
(30%):
The
class
will
be
divided
into
f our
or
five
small
groups,
each
charged
 with
the
task
of
r esearchi ng
a
particular
development
i ssue,
such
as
agricultural
development,
 pover ty
reduction,
the
role
of
N GOs,
public
health
i mprovement,
and
so
on.

This
will
involve
a
 three
stage
process,
each
of
which
i s
to
be
completed
for
one‐third
of
the
mark
f or
thi s
portion
 of
your
grade:
 o Step
1
(10%):
Resear ch
bibliography,
due
in
class
on
Feb
9
 o Step
2
(10%):
Progress
report,
due
in
class
on
Mar
9 
 o Step
3
(10%):
I n‐class
group
presentations
of
findings,
in
class
on
Apr
6
 Final
take‐home
exam
(50%,
for
students
i n
488):
The
final
take‐home
exam
will
consist
of
two
 essays
(7‐10
pp
each)
covering
themes
and
concepts
from
the
cour se
r eadi ngs
(due
Apr
2 0).
 Final
research
paper
(50%,
f or
students
in
588):
An
initial
research
question
and
outline
ar e
 due
in
class
on
March
2
(no
marks,
just
for
feedback );
the
final
research
paper s
(16‐20
pp)
will
 be
due
Apr
20 .
 
 During
the
final
two
weeks
of
the
ter m,
I
will
give
out
the
Student
Evaluation
of
Teaching
(SET)
 forms
in
class
and
you
will
be
ab le
to
evaluate
your
experience
and
my
teaching
in
thi s
course.
 
 Grade
scheme
 The
Depar tment
of
Political
Science
graduate
course
gradi ng
policy
states
that
students
may
be
 awar ded
a
final
grade
of
C+,
C,
or
C‐
in
a
graduate
course.

The
student
will
be
allowed
to
retain
 credit
for 
thi s
course
towar d
completion
of
their
degree.

If
a
student
receives
more
than
one
C
 range
final
grade
in
their
graduate
cour ses,
they
will
have
to
r epeat
one
of
the
cour ses.
Students
i n
 undergr aduate
cour ses
may
receive
grades
ranging
from
F‐
to
A+.

The
gr ade
scale
below
i s
for
488
 students;
students
i n
588
work
on
the
same
scale,
b ut
wi thout
D
range
gr ades.
 
 A+
 93. 0
 – 
 10 0 
 
 B ‐
 
 70.0
–
72.9
 
 D
 53.0
–
56.9
 A
 86.0
–
92.9
 
 C+

 67.0
–
69.9
 
 D‐ 
 50.0
–
52.9
 A‐

 80.0
–
85.9
 
 C

 63.0
–
66.9
 
 F

 35.0
–
49.9
 B +
 
 77.0
–
79.9
 
 C‐

 60.0
–
62.9
 
 F‐

 0.0
–
34.9
 B 

 73.0
–
76.9

 
 D+ 
 57.0
–
59.9
 INC 
 Incomplete
 
 Participation
 As
thi s
is
a
seminar 
cour se,
your
active
engagement
and
par ticipation
are
crucial
to
the
success
of
 the
class
–
no
one
wants
to
si t
in
our
seminar
room
and
listen
to
me
lecture
for
three
hour s
a
week
 while
you
stare
at
me
and
at
each
other.

So
I
expect
you
will
attend
class
every
week ,
and
that
you
 Wi nter
2011
 3
 45‐488/588
 will
arrive
prepared
and
ready
to
di scuss
the
mater ials.
Please
note
that
the
20%
mark
outlined
 above
i s
for
partici pation
and
sub mission
of
di scussion
questions,
and
no t
for
attendance.

If
you
 are
not
i n
class,
of
course,
you
cannot
participate,
but
si mply
b eing
her e
is
not
sufficient
to
ensure
 full
marks
i n
this
portion
of
your
grade.

Neither,
however ,
do
I
mark
partici pati on
b ased
solely
on
 how
much
you
talk .

Rather,
the
mark
you
receive
will
ref lect
both
the
frequency
and
the
quality
of
 your
contribution
to
the
class
discussion.
 
 Late
Policy
 Work
is
to
be
tur ned
in
on
ti me.
If
you
must
turn
in
an
assignment
late,
you
need
to
contact
me
 beforehand
or
as
soon
as
possible
after war d
(i.e.,
within
24
ho urs)
to
let
me
know.
I
only
per mit
 makeup
exams
and
late
sub mission
due
to
emergency
or
illness,
and
you
will
need
to
provide
me
 with
a
vali d
doctor’s
note
or
some
other
for mal
documentation.
Late
work
will
be
marked
off
20 %
 of
the
to tal
possible
marks
per
day
it
is
late.

Questions
or
pr oblems
regardi ng
specific
mark s
 should
be
brought
to
me
no
later
than
o ne
week
from
when
marks
are
deliver ed
i n
class.
 
 Email
and
office
hours
 I
have
regular
office
hours
on
Tuesday
from
1
to
3
pm,
and
on
Wednesday
from
10
am
to
12
noon.
 My
office
is
located
i n
1139
Chrysler
Hall
Nor th.
If
you
need
to
see
me
but
are
unable
to
make
i t
to
 my
office
hours,
please
contact
me
by
email
or
phone
and
we
can
arr ange
a
suitable
alter native
 meeti ng
ti me.

As
a
gener al
r ule,
I
try
to
r eply
to
emails
sent
to
me
within
two
days
of
r eceiving
 them.

If
you
emai l
me
and
do
not
receive
a
reply
wi thin
48
hour s,
assume
that
I
did
not
receive
 your
email,
and
try
again.

I
do
no t
provide
grades
via
email.

P lease
see
me
duri ng
office
hours
or
 check
the
cour se
CLEW
site.

N ote
that
the
universi ty’s
email
policy
states
that
students
must
use
 their
UWindsor
emai l
accounts
to
communicate
wi th
faculty.

I
also
request
that
you
use
 appropriate
etiquette
when
communicating
with
me
via
email
–
I
will
not
reply
to
emai ls
from
 inter net‐based
email
progr ams,
or
to
emails
lacking
a
subject
li ne,
a
greeting,
or
your
name.
 
 Classroom
etiquette
and
academic
dishonesty
 Consi stent
wi th
Univer sity
of
Windsor
policy,
cheati ng,
plagiarism,
and
other
for ms
of
academic
 dishonesty
are
no t
tolerated.

Academic
dishonesty
includes
turni ng
i n
written
work
that
is
not
 your
own,
pur posefully
f ailing
to
provide
adequate
or
full
citations,
and
fei gni ng
i llness
to
avoid
 turni ng
i n
work
on
ti me.

Those
caught
cheating
or
plagi arizing
will
r eceive
a
zero 
on
the
 assignment
and
will
not
be
allowed
to
redo
the
wor k.
Graduate
students
caught
plagi arizing
or
 cheating
endanger
their
status
in
the
Graduate
P rogram.
Tur niti n®
may
b e
used
for
some
or
all
 student
paper s
in
thi s
cour se
at
the
instructor’s
discretion.
You
may
be
asked
to
sub mit
your
paper
 in
electr onic
for m
directly
to
Turniti n®.

P lease
see
the
attached
sheet
for
the
official
Univer sity
 policy.

If
you
f eel
you
need
help,
please
see
me.
 
 In
class,
you
are
expected
to
respect
other s’
right
to
lear n
and
discuss
cour se
materials
in
a
safe
and
 comfortable
environment.
You
should
rely
on
facts,
reason,
and
evidence
to
b ack
ar guments,
and
 overtly
raci st,
sexist,
or
other wise
inflammatory
remarks
will
not
be
tolerated.

I
am
very
open
 about
my
own
political
views,
and
I
encourage
open
debate
and
exchange
of
ideas.
 
 Students
with
learning/physical
differences
 If
you
have
a
lear ning
or
physical
difference,
please
obtai n
the
appropriate
paperwork
from
the
 Univer sity
and
let
me
k now
as
soon
as
possible
so
that
any
necessary
arrangements
can
b e
made.
 
 Wi nter
2011
 4
 45‐488/588
 Course
expectations
 You
should
treat
this
cour se
syllabus
as
a
contract.

Given
this,
I
want
to
clearly
outline
what
I
 expect
of
you
and
what
you
should
expect
of
me
in
this
course.
 
 I
expect
that
you
will:
 Attend
class
regularly
(i.e.,
every
day),
arrive
on
ti me,
and
do
all
r equired
reading;
 Pay
attention,
tur n
off
your
cell
phone,
refrai n
from
distr acti ng
your self
and
your
classmates,
 and
use
your
laptop
only
for
class‐related
activities;
 Approach
the
course
materials
with
an
open
mind
and
a
serious
attitude;
 Strictly
adhere
to
the
student
code
of
conduct
and
observe
the
Univer sity’s
policies
r egarding
 academic
honesty;
 Respect
your
fellow
students’
ri ght
to
learn
in
a
safe
and
hospitable
classr oom;
 Respect
and
take
advantage
of
my
office
hours,
parti cular ly
if
you
are
falli ng
b ehind
or
having
 difficulty
with
the
material;
 Under stand
that
grades
refer 
to
the
quality
and
pr ecision
of
the
work 
being
graded,
not
to
your
 need
for
a
par ticular
grade
or
to
an
open‐ended
negotiation
b etween
you
and
me.
 
 For
my
par t,
you
can
expect
that
I
wi ll:
 Arrive
to
class
on
ti me
and
well‐prepared
to
lecture
and
f acilitate
discussion;
 Complete
the
gr ading
of
exams
and
assi gnments
in
a
timely
f ashion;
 Reply
to
emails
in
a
ti mely
fashion,
usually
wi thin
two
days;
 Be
available
during
my
scheduled
office
hours,
and
will
r e‐schedule
them
if
necessary
(i.e.,
I
 won’t
cancel
them
without
making
them
up
at
some
other 
ti me);
 Take
your
questions
and
ideas
seriously,
so
long
as
they
ar e
relevant
to
the
material;
 Maintain
a
relaxed
but
professional
classr oom
space
for
learning
and
discussion;
 Treat
all
students
eq uitab ly
wi th
regar d
to
gr ading
and
class
discussion.
 Wi nter
2011
 5
 45‐488/588
 Course
Schedule
 
 Jan
12:
I ntroductions
and
assi gnments
 
 Jan
19
and
26:
Theories
of
development,
then
and
now
 V.
Lawson,
Making
Deve lopment
Geog raphy
 
 Feb
2
and
9:
Endemic
poverty
and
failed
governance
 W.
Easterly,
The
White
Man’s
Burde n
 
 Feb
16:
Forei gn
aid
and
North‐South
transfer s
 D.
Moyo,
Dead
Aid
 
 Feb
23:
Reading
week
 No
class
 
 Mar
2:
Foreign
aid
and
Nor th‐South
transfer s
 D.
Moyo,
Dead
Aid
 
 Mar
9
and
16:
Urb ani zation,
housi ng,
and
social
ci tizenship
 M.
Davis,
Planet
of
S lums
 
 Mar
23
and
30:
Microfi nance
and
markets
 A.
Roy,
Pove rty
Capital
 
 
 Apr
6:
Group
presentati ons
 
 Wed,
Apr
20:
Final
papers/exams
due
b y
3:30
pm
 
 
 
 Wi nter
2011
 ...
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