ch_03 - CHAPTER 3 The Structures of Music Multiple-Choice...

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Test Bank to Accompany Listen , Sixth Edition Copyright © 2008 by Bedford/St. Martin's C H A P T E R 3 The Structures of Music Multiple-Choice Questions 1. Melody, p. 25 An organized series of pitches, played or sung in a certain rhythm, is called a: a. melody. b. phrase. c. tune. d. sequence. 5. Characteristics of Tunes, p. 26 Most tunes have a high point. The musical term for this is: a. modulation. b. cadence. c. climax. d. theme. 6. Characteristics of Tunes, p. 26 The moments at the ends of phrases where a melody pauses or stops altogether are called: a. climaxes. b. cadences. c. contrasts. d. balances. 10. Harmony, p. 28 Groupings of several pitches sounded simultaneously are referred to as a(n): a. octaves. b. chromatic scales. c. melodies. d. chords. 11. Harmony, p. 28 When a melody is accompanied with chords, the melody is: a. dissonant. b. polyphonic. c. harmonized. d. chromaticized. 15. Texture, p. 29 Musical texture is a term that refers to the: a. blend of rhythm, meter, and pulse in music.
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Test Bank to Accompany Listen , Sixth Edition Copyright © 2008 by Bedford/St. Martin's b. relationship between the pull toward or away from the tonic in harmony. c. way different tone colors are combined in a piece of music. d. blend of sounds or melodic lines occurring simultaneously in music. 17. Texture, p. 29 The three main textures of Western art music are: a. monophony, polyphony, and counterpoint. b. monophony, nonimitative polyphony, and imitative homophony. c. monophony, homophony, and polyphony. d. monophony, imitative monophony, and nonimitative polyphony. 18. Monophony, p. 29 The texture of a single melody played without accompaniment is: a. monophony. b. homophony. c. polyphony. d. imitative counterpoint. 19. Monophony, p. 29 When you sing in the shower, the texture is most likely to be: a. polyphonic. b.
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This note was uploaded on 10/19/2011 for the course MUS 501 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at S.F. State.

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ch_03 - CHAPTER 3 The Structures of Music Multiple-Choice...

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