ch_15 - CHAPTER 15 Prelude MusicafterBeethoven:Romanticism

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Test Bank to Accompany Listen , Sixth Edition Copyright © 2008 by Bedford/St. Martin's C H A P T E R 15 Prelude Music after Beethoven: Romanticism Multiple-Choice Questions 7. Romanticism and Revolt, p. 241 Which is true of Romantic composers such as Beethoven, Liszt, and Verdi? a. They avoided all involvement in political and social revolution, feeling that music transcended politics. b. They wanted to promote emotional expression without disrupting the established social order. c. People used their music to promote revolutionary movements, but the composers did not associate themselves with such movements. d. As rebels against the social order, they associated themselves with revolutionary and libertarian politics. 12. Concert Life in the Nineteenth Century, p. 244 Increasingly, the focal point for the performance of Romantic music was the: a. concert hall. b. court. c. church. d. chamber music salon. 15.
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This note was uploaded on 10/19/2011 for the course MUS 501 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at S.F. State.

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ch_15 - CHAPTER 15 Prelude MusicafterBeethoven:Romanticism

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