ch08 - Chapter 8 Population Genetics: How Do Genes Move...

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Chapter 8 Population Genetics: How Do Genes Move Through Time and Space? 1. Some traits in living things, like those of pea plants described by Mendel, show discontinuous variation. This means: a. variations come in a smooth connection of different forms b. variations come in a few discrete forms c. variations display a unbroken regular pattern d. variations are attributable to nongenetic factors e. variations come in cycles Ans: b 2. In a frequency diagram, the horizontal or x-axis shows the range of different forms that a trait can exhibit within a population. The vertical or y-axis shows a. the number of variations of the trait that exist within a population b. the number of ways that the phenotype can be expressed for the trait in a population c. the number of individuals (or percent) in the population that exhibit each form of the trait d. the number of alleles that exist within a population for each form of the trait e. the number of genes in the pool that can be expressed for the trait Ans: c 3. In 1937 Dobzhansky wrote Genetics and the Origin of Species bringing together two schools of biological thought. Which two? I. Naturalist: rejected Mendel’s ideas but found Darwin’s consistent with their observations II. Environmentalists: Environmental factors alone control expression of genes III. Geneticists: Genes alone control the expression of traits IV. Experimentalist: agreed with principles of Mendelian genetics but rejected natural selection a. I and II b. I and III c. II and III d. I and IV e. III and IV Ans: d 98
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Chapter 8 4. Human birthweight is a continuous variation that is babies arrive at many different weights. If we were to plot a frequency diagram showing the range of human birthweight, it would look like: a. A “J” shape b. A sequence of different height bars c. A bell-shape d. An upside down “M” shape e. An “S” shape Ans: c 5. A population consists of 4000 organisms. How many alleles for a single gene “K” are found in that population? a. 8000 b. 4000 c. 2000 d. 1000 e. 4850 Ans: a 6. A gene “L” is known to have two alleles, a dominant one (L) and a recessive (l) one. If the frequency of the dominant “L” allele is 0.32, what is the frequency of the recessive “l” allele? a. 0.32 b. 0.64 c. 0.68 d. 0.86 e. 1.68 Ans: c 7. All of the following are sweeping assumptions made by Hardy and Weinberg when they derived their principle of genetic equilibrium EXCEPT: a. large population b. no emigration c. no immigration d. non-random mating e. no mutation Ans: d 99
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Chapter 8 8. A population is observed for about ten generations. In that time, the gene F is extensively studied and its allelic frequencies are not seen to change. This population is in: a. disequilibrium b. hereditary balance c. genetic equilibrium d. chemical equilibrium e. traditional stability Ans: c 9. When we sum the probabilities of all the different possible genotypes, we account for the entire population. Which equations below state that the proportion of homozygous individuals,
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ch08 - Chapter 8 Population Genetics: How Do Genes Move...

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