ch10 - Chapter 10 Bioenergics: How Do Organisms Acquire and...

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Chapter 10 Bioenergics: How Do Organisms Acquire and Use Energy? 1. Organisms extract and use energy to stay alive. The chemical reactions occurring in cells that convert one molecule into another to provide the energy needed to stay alive is termed: a. Magnetism b. Metabolism c. Movement d. Mechanical energy e. Molecular dynamics Ans: b 2. Work can have many definitions. Which of the following would NOT be considered a definition of work? a. Movement of an object when force is applied b. movement of a muscle when stimulated by a nerve c. Construction of a protein by assembling amino acids d. Maintaining water gradient between dialysis bag and liquid environment e. Maintaining equilibrium by the cell membrane Ans: d 3. Ice melting in a cup of hot tea illustrates the second law of thermodynamics. The second law states that: a. Changes always occur in a direction in which the energy of the universe becomes more disordered b. For every reaction there is an equal and opposite reaction c. Molecules will move from a region of greater concentration to a region of lesser concentration d. Energy cannot be created or destroyed e. Acceleration equals force times motion Ans: a 4. Joseph Priestley’s experiment of placing a candle and a mouse under a bell jar show that both fire and animal metabolism cause the same kinds of changes to the air. Antoine Lavoisier proved that they both consumed a. carbon dioxide 133
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Chapter 10 b. methane c. oxygen d. nitrogen e. carbon monoxide Ans: c 5. Which statement below is consistent with the First Law of Thermodynamics? a. Energy cannot be eaten. b. Energy can be created and destroyed. c. The universe tends toward randomness. d. Energy can be neither created nor destroyed. e. Energy is not interconvertable. Ans: d 6. Which of the following is an example of the First Law of Thermodynamics? a. gasoline powering a car's movement b. an ice cube melting c. a thrown ball d. electricity stored in a battery e. water freezing Ans: a 7. According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, energy will ______become more randomly distributed during a process. a. spontaneously b. with an energy input c. not d. non-spontaneously e. never Ans: a 8. Entropy is a term that describes: a. the amount of disorder in the universe b. the amount of heat in the universe 134
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Chapter 10 c. the amount of predictability in the universe d. the amount of authority in the universe e. the amount of energy in the universe Ans: a 9. The wood sitting in your fireplace waiting to provide cozy lighting contains a. kinetic energy b. potential energy c. metabolic energy d. activation energy e. chemical energy Ans: b 10. Which energy sources below may have been present on the early Earth and might have worked on atmospheric chemicals to stimulate chemical reactions? a. lightning and ultraviolet light
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ch10 - Chapter 10 Bioenergics: How Do Organisms Acquire and...

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