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PP SB to final - Staphlococcus and Symbiosis: Commensalism...

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Staphlococcus and Symbiosis: Commensalism BIOL 2051 General Microbiology Lab 19 4/12/10
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Bring clover to lab on Wednesday for Expt. 36 You need the roots! More specifically you will need the tiny pinkish root nodules on the roots.
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Normal flora of skin, nose, throat Gram +, catalase +, salt tolerant Staphylococcus aureus Yellow pigmented Produces coagulase; Can be pathogenic food poisoning, toxic shock syndrome, styes, pimples, boils, nosocomial infections Staphylococcus epidermidis No pigment Non pathogenic; found on skin or mucous membranes Coagulase enzyme which converts fibrinogen to fibrin causing plasma to clot; virulence factor. New! Expt. 34 – Isolation and Identification of Staphylococci
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1. Plate on Mannitol Salt Agar (MSA) 7.5% salt Selective for salt tolerant bacteria Mannitol Differential for mannitol fermenters Phenol red – pH indicator, turns yellow under pH 6.6 2. Inoculate plasma tube If bacteria produce coagulase, then the plasma will clot. Two ways to differentiate S. aureus from S. epidermidis S. epidermidis S. aureus
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Expt. 34 – Procedure (pages 166-67) Per person: 1 MSA plate Streak from nose, throat or skin Inoculate 1 st quadrant with swab, then use inoculating loop to finish streak plate Discard swabs in beaker of vesphene on bench top, not in trash Parafilm plate closed Incubate MSA plates at 37 ˚ C Demo plates of S. aureus and S. epidermidis will be available for comparison next lab
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New! Expt. 35 – Symbiosis: An Example of Commensalism Symbiosis intimate relationship between 2 dissimilar organisms. 5 types of symbiosis: 1. Mutualism both organisms benefit from the relationship. Ex. Lichens 2. Commensalism one organism benefits, the other is unaffected. Ex. Bacteroides E. coli in intestinal tract.
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both organisms benefit but relationship is not necessary for their survival; each supplies a nutrient required by the other under certain conditions. Ex. Lactobacillus Enterococcus can grow without each other on enriched media but can only grow on minimal media if both are present. 4. Parasitism host is harmed but parasite benefits. Ex. Fleas, Bdellovibrio and E. coli 5. Antagonism one organism produces substance that inhibits another organism. Ex.
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This note was uploaded on 10/11/2011 for the course BIOL 2051 taught by Professor Brininstool during the Spring '07 term at LSU.

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PP SB to final - Staphlococcus and Symbiosis: Commensalism...

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