Chapter 5 Phase Interactions Part 1

Chapter 5 Phase Interactions Part 1 - PhaseInteractions

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Phase Interactions  An emphasis on interactions in  Louisiana’s coastal zone 
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Importance  Phase interactions between the aquatic  phase, sediments and suspended  colloidal material are very important in 
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In Water  Algal utilization of dissolved solids and gases in  photosynthesis and other biochemical processes Bacterial degradation of particulate organic  matter Chemical reactions generating precipitates or  gases Transport of trace elements (iron, etc. ) through  aquatic systems as colloidal compounds or sorbed  to solid particles Presence of pollutant hydrocarbons and some  pesticides as immiscible films on the water  surface
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In Sediments  1. Finely divided matter  covering bottom of  rivers, streams, etc. 2. Mixtures  of fine, medium and coarse grained  minerals (clay, silt, sand) mixed with  organic matter. 3. Variable composition  ranging from pure  mineral to predominantly organic matter. 4. Repositories of  biological, chemical and  pollutant detritus. Potential for transfer of  chemical species from sediments into food  chain via bottom dwelling organisms  such  as shellfish (shrimp, crayfish, crabs).
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8 Figure 5.2 Alternate layers of CaCO3( s ) and FeS( s ) in lake sediment Organic and Carbonaceous Sedimentary Materials • Particularly important for binding organic pollutants • Organics may be held for many years • Black carbon from combustion
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9 5.3 Solubilities Solubilities of solids From solubility products (see calculation of solubility of BaSO4 in text • Intrinsic solubility, example of CaSO4 S = [Ca2+] + [CaSO4] Solubilities of ionic solids affected by several factors,  example of Pb CO3  (see Section 3.15) • Increased by chelation of metal:   Pb2+ + T3-  PbT - • Increased by reaction of anion: Pb CO3  + H+  Pb2+ + H CO3 - Presence of common ion: H CO3 -   H+ +  CO3 2-   From solubility product From intrinsic solubility
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Henry’s law: At constant temperature the solubility of a gas in a liquid is proportional to the partial pressure of the gas in contact with the liquid X( g X( aq ) • [X( aq )] = KPX Increased by acid-base reactions
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This note was uploaded on 10/11/2011 for the course ENVS 4101 taught by Professor Portier during the Spring '10 term at LSU.

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Chapter 5 Phase Interactions Part 1 - PhaseInteractions

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