Chapter 5 Phases Part2

Chapter 5 Phases Part2 - PhasesPartTwo Interactionswiththe...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Phases Part Two  Interactions with the  environment
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Key Point  The degree of sorption of organic compounds is  generally inversely proportional to their water solubility.  The more water-insoluble compounds tend to be taken up strongly by  lipophilic (fat-loving) solid materials, such as humic substances (see  Section 3.17).  Compounds having a relatively high vapor pressure can be lost from water or solids by evaporation.  When this happens, photochemical processes (see Chapter 9) can play an important role in their  degradation.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
In suspended matter
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Interstitial Water 
Background image of page 6
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Adsorption Isotherms 
Background image of page 8
Freundlich Adsorption Isotherms 
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sorption on Suspended Sediments 
Background image of page 10
Sorption drivers in the environment
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The octanol-water partition coefficient is the ratio of the  concentration of a chemical in octanol and in water at equilibrium  and at a specified temperature.  Octanol is an organic solvent that is used as a surrogate for natural  organic matter. This parameter is used in many environmental  studies to help determine the fate of chemicals in the environment. 
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/11/2011 for the course ENVS 4101 taught by Professor Portier during the Spring '10 term at LSU.

Page1 / 53

Chapter 5 Phases Part2 - PhasesPartTwo Interactionswiththe...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online