Exam_2_Spring_2010_study_guide_-1

Exam_2_Spring_2010_study_guide_-1 - Exam 2 ENVS 4101 Spring...

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Exam 2 ENVS 4101 Spring 2010 You’re half of the way there…….
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Power points & Book Chapters Chapter 4 Oxidation Reduction Chapter 5 Phases part 1 and 2 Chapter 6 Aquatic Microbiology Extra notes ( see attached) Book Chapters 4 and 5
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Key Concepts Oxidation vs reduction Half-reactions Hydrophilic
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Equilibrium Constant The equilibrium constant for a redox reaction involving n electrons is given in terms of pE by the following
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The Nernst Equation The Nernst equation is used to account for the effect of different activities upon electrode potential. As applied to the half-reaction
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Relationships
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pE and pH pE is important in redox reactions in the same way that pH is important in acid-base reactions
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pE pH
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Colloids
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Sorption The degree of sorption of organic compounds is generally inversely proportional to their water solubility. The more water-insoluble compounds tend to be taken up strongly by lipophilic (fat-loving) solid materials, such as humic substances (see Section 3.17). Compounds having a relatively high vapor pressure can be lost from water or solids by evaporation. When this happens, photochemical processes (see Chapter 9) can play an important role in their degradation.
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The octanol-water partition coefficient is the ratio of the concentration of a chemical in octanol and in water at equilibrium and at a specified temperature. Octanol is an organic solvent that is used as a surrogate for natural organic matter. This parameter is used in many environmental studies to help determine the fate of chemicals in the environment. An example would be using the coefficient to predict the extent a contaminant will bioaccumulate in fish. The octanol-water partition coefficient has been correlated to water
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Exam_2_Spring_2010_study_guide_-1 - Exam 2 ENVS 4101 Spring...

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