Chapter I intro - Chapter I - Introduction Introductory...

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Chapter I - Introduction Introductory paragraphs Chapter I begins with a few short introductory paragraphs (a couple of pages at most). The primary goal of the introductory paragraphs is to catch the attention of the readers and to get them "turned on" about the subject. It sets the stage for the paper and puts your topic in perspective. The introduction often contains dramatic and general statements about the need for the study. It uses dramatic illustrations or quotes to set the tone. When writing the introduction, put yourself in your reader's position - would you continue reading? Statement of the Problem The statement of the problem is the focal point of your research. It is just one sentence (with several paragraphs of elaboration). You are looking for something wrong. ....or something that needs close attention ....or existing methods that no longer seem to be working. Example of a problem statement: "The frequency of job layoffs is creating fear, anxiety, and a loss of productivity in middle management workers." While the problem statement itself is just one sentence, it is always accompanied by several paragraphs that elaborate on the problem. Present persuasive arguments why the problem is important enough to study. Include the opinions of others (politicians, futurists, other professionals). Explain how the problem relates to business, social or political trends by presenting data that demonstrates the scope and depth of the problem. Try to give dramatic and concrete illustrations of the problem. After writing this section, make sure you can easily identify the single sentence that is the problem statement. Purpose The purpose is a single statement or paragraph that explains what the study intends to accomplish. A few typical statements are: The goal of this study is to. .. ... overcome the difficulty with . .. ... discover what . .. ... understand the causes or effects of . .. ... refine our current understanding of . .. ... provide a new interpretation of . .. ... understand what makes ___ successful or unsuccessful Significance of the Study This section creates a perspective for looking at the problem. It points out how your study relates to the larger issues and uses a persuasive rationale to justify the reason for your study. It makes the purpose worth pursuing. The significance of the study answers the questions: Why is your study important? To whom is it important? What benefit(s) will occur if your study is done? Research Questions and/or Hypotheses and/or Null Hypotheses Chapter I lists the research questions (although it is equally acceptable to present the hypotheses or null hypotheses). No elaboration is included in this section. An example would be: The research questions for this study will be: 1. What are the attitudes of. .. 2. Is there a significant difference between.
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This note was uploaded on 10/10/2011 for the course DPWH research taught by Professor Enr.marietapadilla during the Spring '11 term at Divine Word.

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Chapter I intro - Chapter I - Introduction Introductory...

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