Motivation and Emotion

Motivation and Emotion - Running head MOTIVATION AND...

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Running head: MOTIVATION AND EMOTION 1 Motivation and Emotion Angel Bingham PSY/202 September 18, 2011 Rebecca Marek
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MOTIVATION AND EMOTION 2 Motivation and Emotion Motivation is best described as “the factors that direct and energize the behavior of human beings and other organisms” (Feldman, 2010, p. 244). The different motivation approaches can be divided into five categories: Instinct, Drive-Reduction, Arousal, Incentive, and Cognitive. The instinctive approach refers to the patterns organisms are born with that give the energy to channel various actions in the direction required for survival. An example of an instinctive approach could be sexual behavior in response to the instinct to reproduce (Feldman, 2010, p. 244). This approach can affect motivation because it is the instinctive reactions that can keep organisms alive. The drive-reduction approach proposes that a lack of something needed induces an internal drive to fulfill that need. An example of this approach could be hunger. When someone feels he or she needs food, that person will find something to eat to fulfill that need. Two types
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Motivation and Emotion - Running head MOTIVATION AND...

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