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Lecture - 7 - April 13th

Lecture - 7 - April 13th - INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD Social...

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INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD Social Development 2. Di erences in Attachment Placed in ‘a strange situation’: 60 % of children display secure attachmen t , that is, they explore their environment happily in the presence of their mothers. When she leaves, they are distressed; when she returns they seek contact with her. 30 % of children display insecure attachmen t , that is, they do not readily explore their environment, and may even cling to their mothers. When she leaves, they either cry loudly and remain upset or seem indi ff erent to her departure and return. Why do these di ff erences exist? Factor Explanation Mother Both rat pups and human infants develop secure a5achments if the mother is relaxed and a5entive. Father In many cultures where fathers share the responsibility of raising children, similar secure a5achments develop.
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INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD Social Development 2. Di erences in Attachment Separation anxiety peaks at about 13 months of age, and this seems to be true regardless of culture, whether they are raised at home or sent to daycare.
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INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD Social Development 3. Deprivation of Attachment What happens when circumstances prevent a child from forming attachments? Children become: 1. Withdrawn 2.Frightened 3. Unable to develop speech http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ljVd6XS - J0s A link to the the rest of the video, if interested: http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=STn3bpTTU6c&feature=relat ed
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INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD Social Development 4. Self - Concept When do we develop our sense of self? Put kids in front of a mirror and put a red dot on their nose and assess at what age they touch the dot. Kids begin to touch the dot ( develop physical self - recognition ) between the ages of 15 and 18 months of age.
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INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD Social Development 4. Self - Concept How does our sense of self develop over time? Our self - concept develops from being concrete and based on observable characteristics ( e.g., I’m a boy. I have brown hair. ) to being more abstract and based on psychological characteristics ( e.g., I am a curious, friendly person. ) .
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INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD Social Development 5. Parenting Style Practice Description Personality of Children Authoritarian Parents impose rules and expect obedience. Low self-­Ăesteem and social skills Permissive Parents submit to children’s demands. Aggressive and Immature Authoritative Parents are demanding but responsive to their children. High self-­Ăesteem, self-­Ă reliance and social competence
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INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD - BRAIN PLASTICITY http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSu9HGnlMV0
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ADOLESCENCE Physical Development Adolescence begins with puberty ( sexual maturation ) . Puberty occurs earlier in females ( 11 years ) than males ( 13 years ) . Thus height in females increases before males.
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ADOLESCENCE Physical Development Adolescence begins with puberty ( sexual maturation ) .
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