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Lecture - 10 - April 22

Lecture - 10 - April 22 - OUR SENSES VISION Visual...

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OUR SENSES - VISION Photoreceptors Bipolar Cell To Brain for Interpretation The opponent - process theory suggests that opposing retinal processes ( red - green, yellow - blue, white - black ) enable color vision. Visual Information Processing - Focus on Color Vision
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OUR SENSES - VISION The opponent - process theory suggests that opposing retinal processes ( red - green, yellow - blue, white - black ) enable color vision. Visual Information Processing - Focus on Color Vision
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OUR SENSES - VISION The opponent - process theory suggests that opposing retinal processes ( red - green, yellow - blue, white - black ) enable color vision. Visual Information Processing - Focus on Color Vision
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QUESTION # 6 Before going to sleep one night, Jill reads her daughter, Stacey, a bedtime story. The book is filled with pictures. In particular, there is a reoccurring picture of a character that always wears a bright purple shirt. Stacey is fascinated by this character and can’t stop staring at him. When Jill finishes the story she abruptly closes the book and tells her daughter it’s time for bed. Jill then notices a look of horror on Stacey’s face. Jill asks, “What’s wrong?” Stacey replies, “There’s a green monster on the wall!” Assuming there isn’t really a green monster on the wall, how might we explain Stacey’s perception? Give a step - by - step account of how Stacey’s perception of the green monster might have come about. Please only use words ( do not draw a diagram ) . This question ( as with all questions ) is to be answered in a maximum of one page, double - spaced , using 12 point, arial font.
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Stimulus Input - Sound Waves OUR SENSES - HEARING Frequency = Pitch Amplitude = Loudness Sound waves consist of compressed and expanding air molecules.
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The Ear - Overview OUR SENSES - HEARING Outer Ear : Collects and sends sounds to the eardrum Middle Ear : Chamber between eardrum and cochlea containing three tiny bones ( hammer, anvil, stirrup ) that concentrate the vibrations of the eardrum on the cochlea’s oval window Inner Ear : Innermost part of the ear, containing the cochlea
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The Ear - Cochlea OUR SENSES - HEARING Cochlea : Coiled, bony, fluid - filled tube in the inner ear that transforms sound vibrations to auditory signals.
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Perceiving Loudness OUR SENSES - HEARING The perception of loudness derives from the number of hair cells that are activated, with louder sounds ( higher amplitude waves ) activating more hair cells than quieter sounds ( lower amplitude waves ) .
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Perceiving Pitch - Theories OUR SENSES - HEARING Place theory assumes we hear di ff erent pitches because di ff erent sound waves trigger activity at di ff erent places along the cochlea’s basilar membrane But displacement of the basilar membrane is not fine enough to account for our ability to discriminate between pitches ( in particular for low pitches ) !
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