Lecture - 16 - May 6th

Lecture - 16 - May 6th - MIDTERM 2 - MONDAY MAY 9TH 45...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MIDTERM 2 - MONDAY MAY 9TH 45 questions The exam covers everything SINCE the last midterm: chapter 6 ( sensation and perception ) , chapter 7 ( learning ) , chapter 8 ( memory ) and the chapter 9 ( only “thinking” parts - pages 369 - 382 ) . Remember to bring questions #6 - 9 to the exam ( 2 will be chosen to hand in for grading ) There are half - a - dozen or so questions that refer directly to experiments. So knowing experimenters’ names, what they did and found, and ( if applicable ) what principle the results support would be a good idea. Remember to bring the big pink scantron!
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 9 COGNITION
Background image of page 2
COGNITION Cognition refers to all mental activities associated with thinking, knowing, remembering and communicating.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CONCEPT FORMATION AND CATEGORIZATION To help us think about and deal with the world we use concepts - a mental category of similar objects, events, ideas or people - which are in turn organized into category hierarchies.
Background image of page 4
How do we form our concepts? 1. Classical ( Defnitional ) View An instance is classiFed as belonging to a category if it possess certain necessary and su cient features. A Fgure with three straight lines and three angles. CONCEPT FORMATION AND CATEGORIZATION Illustration - Triangles What is a triangle?
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
How do we form our concepts? CONCEPT FORMATION AND CATEGORIZATION Illustration - Birds What is a bird? 2. Probabilistic ( Prototypical ) View An instance is classiFed as belonging to a category if the similarity between the instance and category is above some critical threshold. An animal that has feathers, a beak, wings, and can ±y. People seem to use prototypes for classiFcation often: for example, people more quickly classify a robin as a bird than a penguin as a bird.
Background image of page 6
USING CONCEPTS TO MAKE DECISIONS There are two basic ways to solve a problem or make a decision: 1. Use of an Algorithm A systematic approach that exhausts all possibilities to arrive at a solution. Tends to be slow but accurate. Y P L O S O H C Y G We could apply an algorithm in which we try each letter in each location - but there are some 907, 200 permutations!
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
There are two basic was to solve a problem or make a decision: 2. Use of a Heuristic A short - cut approach that allows us to solve problems and make decisions more e ciently. Tends to be fast but more error
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 25

Lecture - 16 - May 6th - MIDTERM 2 - MONDAY MAY 9TH 45...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online