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Lecture - 18 - May 16th

Lecture - 18 - May 16th - TYPES OF EMOTIONS Fear 1...

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TYPES OF EMOTIONS Fear Fear describes an emotional reaction to threatening, immanent danger with a strong desire to escape the situation. Fear prepares our bodies to flee from the situation and thus protects us from harm Fearful expressions have been shown to improve peripheral vision and speed up eye movements, thus boosting sensory input ( Susskind et al., 2008 ) . 1. Description and Function
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TYPES OF EMOTIONS Fear Fears can be learned via classical conditioning, operant conditioning or observational learning Susan Mineka ( 1985, 2002 ) , for example, found that monkeys reared in captivity ( and that were not naturally afraid of snakes ) learned to to fear snakes by observing monkeys reared in the wild ( which were naturally afraid of snakes ) : after watching the wild - reared monkeys refuse to reach for food in the presence of a snake, the captivity - reared monkeys developed a fear of snakes. 2. Causes of Fear
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TYPES OF EMOTIONS Fear Fears can be learned via classical conditioning, operant conditioning or observational learning Susan Mineka ( 1985, 2002 ) , for example, found that monkeys reared in captivity ( and that were not naturally afraid of snakes ) learned to to fear snakes by observing monkeys reared in the wild ( which were naturally afraid of snakes ) : after watching the wild - reared monkeys refuse to reach for food in the presence of a snake, the captivity - reared monkeys developed a fear of snakes. Still, we are biologically predisposed to learn some fears over others: the captive monkeys, for example, didn’t learn to fear flowers when clever editing replaces the snake with a flower! 2. Causes of Fear
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TYPES OF EMOTIONS Fear Fears can be learned via classical conditioning, operant conditioning or observational learning Susan Mineka ( 1985, 2002 ) , for example, found that monkeys reared in captivity ( and that were not naturally afraid of snakes ) learned to to fear snakes by observing monkeys reared in the wild ( which were naturally afraid of snakes ) : after watching the wild - reared monkeys refuse to reach for food in the presence of a snake, the captivity - reared monkeys developed a fear of snakes Still, we are biologically predisposed to learn some fears over others: the captive monkeys, for example, didn’t learn to fear flowers when clever editing replaces the snake with a flower! Fearfulness seems to have a strong genetic component: among identical twins, even when reared separately, one twin’s level of fearfulness is similar to the other’s ( Lykken, 1982 ) 2. Causes of Fear
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TYPES OF EMOTIONS Fear Fears can develop into phobias, which can be either specific ( arachnophobia - fear of spiders ) or di ff use ( agoraphobia - fear of leaving the house ) 3. Consequences of Fear
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TYPES OF EMOTIONS Anger Anger describes an emotional reaction to the perception that one has been o ff ended or wronged in some manner Anger helps us to assert ourselves and therefore to help us to get what ( we perceive anyways ) is rightfully ours 1. Description and Function
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TYPES OF EMOTIONS Anger
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