Lecture Notes on Cryptography

A Concrete Introduction to Higher Algebra, 2nd Edition

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture Notes on Cryptography Shafi Goldwasser 1 Mihir Bellare 2 August 2001 1 MIT Laboratory of Computer Science, 545 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. E-mail: shafi@theory.lcs.mit.edu ; Web page: http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/ shafi 2 Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Mail Code 0114, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA. E-mail: mihir@cs.ucsd.edu ; Web page: http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/users/mihir Foreword This is a set of lecture notes on cryptography compiled for 6.87s, a one week long course on cryptography taught at MIT by Sha Goldwasser and Mihir Bellare in the summers of 19962001. The notes were formed by merging notes written for Sha Goldwassers Cryptography and Cryptanalysis course at MIT with notes written for Mihir Bellares Cryptography and network security course at UCSD. In addition, Rosario Gennaro (as Teaching Assistant for the course in 1996) contributed Section 9.6, Section 11.4, Section 11.5, and Appendix D to the notes, and also compiled, from various sources, some of the problems in Appendix E. Cryptography is of course a vast subject. The thread followed by these notes is to develop and explain the notion of provable security and its usage for the design of secure protocols. Much of the material in Chapters 2, 3 and 7 is a result of scribe notes, originally taken by MIT graduate students who attended Professor Goldwassers Cryptography and Cryptanalysis course over the years, and later edited by Frank DIppolito who was a teaching assistant for the course in 1991. Frank also contributed much of the advanced number theoretic material in the Appendix. Some of the material in Chapter 3 is from the chapter on Cryptography, by R. Rivest, in the Handbook of Theoretical Computer Science. Chapters 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10, and Sections 9.5 and 7.4.6, were written by Professor Bellare for his Cryptography and network security course at UCSD. All rights reserved. Sha Goldwasser and Mihir Bellare Cambridge, Massachusetts, August 2001. 2 Table of Contents 1 Introduction to Modern Cryptography 11 1.1 Encryption: Historical Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.2 Modern Encryption: A Computational Complexity Based Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.3 A Short List of Candidate One Way Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.4 Security Denitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.5 The Model of Adversary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1.6 Road map to Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2 One-way and trapdoor functions 17 2.1 One-Way Functions: Motivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.2 One-Way Functions: Denitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2008 for the course CS 276 taught by Professor Trevisan during the Spring '02 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Lecture Notes on Cryptography - Lecture Notes on...

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