Ksp handout_v2

Ksp handout_v2 - Goal Determining whether mixing two...

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1 Goal: Determining whether mixing two solutions will form a precipitate. Method: It’s all in the reaction quotient, Q. Remember comparing Q with K tells you what direction the reaction will proceed. If Q > K, reaction will proceed toward ______________. If Q < K, reaction will proceed toward ______________. So as an example: A 200.0 mL solution of 1.3 x 10 -3 M AgNO 3 is mixed with 100.0 mL of a 4.5 x 10 -5 M Na 2 S solution. Will precipitate of Ag 2 S form? The K sp for the reaction is 1.6 x 10 -49 . Thought process: What reaction are we talking about: A g 2 S(s) ± 2Ag + (aq) + S 2- (aq) What is the K sp equation for this reaction? K sp = ___________________ What is the concentration of Ag + (aq) and S 2- (aq)? (Remember you changed the volume of solution by mixing them together.) What is Q when you mix the solutions? How does Q compare to K? Do you expect precipitate?
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2 Goal: Calculating the concentration of each ion in solution when a precipitate is formed. Method: General strategy involves assuming that because K sp is so low, if a precipitate forms, it will do so quantitatively. We can then use the equilibrium expression involving the solubility of a salt (with a common ion) to solve for the equilibrium concentration of
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Ksp handout_v2 - Goal Determining whether mixing two...

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