EE203-SUNYBuffalo-04-Chapter09-02

Kwang w oh eesuny buffalo lecture 04 chapter 09 27 2

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Unformatted text preview: e often used since the exponential function e is used extensively for circuit analysis and circuit problem solution EE 203 Circuit Analysis 2 | Spring 2008 | Prof. Kwang W. Oh | EE@SUNY-Buffalo Lecture 04 | Chapter 09 | 2/7 | 13/17 EE 203 Circuit Analysis 2 | Spring 2008 | Prof. Kwang W. Oh | EE@SUNY-Buffalo Lecture 04 | Chapter 09 | 2/7 | 14/17 SMALL for Big Things University at Buffalo SMALL for Big Things University at Buffalo Nanobio Sensors & MicroActuators Learning Lab The State University of New York Nanobio Sensors & MicroActuators Learning Lab The State University of New York The Phasor and Its Transforms Frequency Domain and Time Domain The phasor and its transforms find such use in circuit analysis. Reduces the tasks, time, and effort to find maximum amplitudes and phase angles for steady-state sinusoidal responses. Since the transient solutions dies out, the steady-state must also satisfy the differential equation that defines the circuits behavior. In linear circuits, having a sinusoidal source, the steady-state response has the same frequency. The form of the steady-state response has the form of where A is the maximum amplitude of the response signal and β is the the phase angle. The solution to the circuit analysis in this form is in the domain of complex complex numbers (the frequency domain). EE 203 Circuit Analysis 2 | Spring 2008 | Prof. Kwang W. Oh | EE@SUNY-Buffalo Lecture 04 | Chapter 09 | 2/7 | 15/17 Representation Representation of as a phasor rotating counterclockwise and its projection on the real axis as a function of time Frequency (or Complex-Number) Domain Time Domain Im t = t 1 t = t0 =0 t = t2 φ 0 t1 t2 t3 Re t = t3 Rotation at ω radians per sec EE 203 Circuit Analysis 2 | Spring 2008 | Prof. Kwang W. Oh | EE@SUNY-Buffalo Lecture 04 | Chapter 09 | 2/7 | 16/17 SMALL for Big Things University at Buffalo Nanobio Sensors & MicroActuators Learning Lab The State University of New York Example 9.5 •20 cos(-300) •20 sin(-300) •40 cos(600) •40 sin(600) •Sqrt (37.322+24.642) •arctan (24.64/37.32) EE 203 Circuit Analysis 2 | Spring 2008 | Prof. Kwang W. Oh | EE@SUNY-Buffalo Lecture 04 | Chapter 09 | 2/7 | 17/17...
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