chapter summary - Tim Hoskins 9-4-07 Chapter summaries...

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Tim Hoskins 9-4-07 Chapter summaries Chapter 1 - Every Trip is a Quest (Except when it’s not) A quest has a quester, a destination, a purpose, challenges and trials, and then the real reason to go there. The real reason is self-knowledgeable, with the quester not knowing of the real reason until the end of the journey. In literature, one cannot trust what they read because the author can simply write whatever they want. Trouble-free events in the story can later pop up and be very important decisions. Nothing is set in stone and it is important to remember that not all quest are successful. Chapter 2 - Nice to Eat With You: Acts of Communion Sometimes a meal is a meal, and nothing other than that, but when people eat or drink together, it’s communion. Communion is an act of sharing and peace. Because eating is such a personal thing, people tend to only eat with those that they are interested in. Meals are very important moments, and need to be well described. James Joyce once described a Christmas dinner by saying, “In the centre of the table there stood, as sentries to a fruit-stand which upheld a pyramid of oranges and American apples, two squat old-fashioned decanters of cut glass, one containing port and the other dark sherry.” The author’s point is to draw the reader in with every description. Failed meals also carry meaning, by showing disgust or hate.
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Tim Hoskins 9-4-07 Chapter summaries Chapter 3- Nice to Eat you: Acts of Vampires A vampire does not only serve as something to be scary, but as something that is selfish and exploitive. An old, but attractive, man (vampire) lures a young woman and steals her “innocence”. She is now cursed with his sin, and looked down upon by other men. An author who captures this must make their vampire evil, attractive, mysterious, and luring. The vampire’s prey must be someone who represents innocence and youth. The vampire grows in strength by weakening someone else. Chapter 4- If It’s Square, It’s a Sonnet A sonnet is said to be “the only poetic form the great majority of readers ever needs to know.” It is a short, various, and versatile, square shaped poem that usually consists of fourteen lines written in iambic pentameter. The sonnet will also use choice of images, music of language, idea content, and cleverness of wordplay to appeal to the reader. A sonnet is arranged in lines but written in sentences by letting 8 lines carry one idea, while six carry a related idea. Remember that short poems take longer to finish because they have to be perfect.
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Tim Hoskins 9-4-07 Chapter summaries Chapter 5- Now, Where Have I Seen Her Before? By paying attention while reading, one will begin to notice patterns, archetypes, and recurrences. Original work of literature does not exist because writers use prior texts purposefully. Stories grow out of each other, sometimes being direct and obvious, while other times not. A Writer hopes that a reader will associate their characters with famous older characters from different books. Finding
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chapter summary - Tim Hoskins 9-4-07 Chapter summaries...

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