5DEMAYO - The Meaning of Cinco de Mayo P. Pasmanick, 1992...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Meaning of Cinco de Mayo P. Pasmanick, © 1992 After Mexico won its independence from Spain in 1821, it faced internal power struggles that left it in a confusing and volatile state of rebellion and instability for years. The southern parts of the new "Mexican Empire" broke off to form the present Central American republics, while the northern half of the territory was lost to the United States. Mexico was invaded by the US, Spain, and France. The second French invasion began in 1861, during the administration of the national hero Benito Juárez. Mexican guerilla forces, determined to protect their capital, decided to make their stand defending the strategic town of Puebla. On May 5, 1862, outgunned and outnumbered over two to one, these untrained forces successfully defended their positions, then attacked and scattered the French troops, achieving a total victory over soldiers deemed among the best trained and equipped in the world. The following year, however, the French went on to capture Puebla and ruled Mexico until 1867. Cinco de Mayo, therefore, does not celebrate Mexico's independence nor does it
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

5DEMAYO - The Meaning of Cinco de Mayo P. Pasmanick, 1992...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online