CH 7 - CH 7: Language of Chemistry Renee Y. Becker CHM 1025...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CH 7: Language of Chemistry Renee Y. Becker CHM 1025 Valencia Community College
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
IUPAC The I nternational U nion of P ure and A pplied C hemistry, IUPAC, has set rules for naming compounds. IUPAC set the rules for the naming and classification of inorganic compounds in 1940. These rules, referred to as IUPAC nomenclature are still in use today.
Background image of page 2
Most inorganic compounds do not contain the element carbon. The exceptions are carbon dioxide, CO 2 , and carbonates, which contain the ion CO 3 2– . There are 5 common classes of inorganic compounds: binary ionic, ternary ionic, binary molecular, binary acid, and ternary oxyacid. Classification of Compounds
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Below is a flow chart for the classification of inorganic compounds. Classification of Compounds
Background image of page 4
Binary ionic compounds contain two elements: one metal and one nonmetal. – NaCl and AlCl 3 are binary ionic compounds. Ternary ionic compounds contain three elements, at least one metal and one nonmetal. – KNO 3 and Al(NO 3 ) 3 are ternary ionic compounds. Ionic Compounds
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Binary molecular compounds contain two elements and both are nonmetals. Some examples of binary molecular compounds are ammonia, NH 3 ; methane, CH 4 ; carbon dioxide, CO 2 ; and tetraphosphorous trisulfide, P 4 S 3 . Molecular Compounds
Background image of page 6
An aqueous solution is produced when a compound dissolves in water. It is indicated by the symbol ( aq ). A binary acid is an aqueous solution of a compound containing hydrogen and one other nonmetal. HF ( aq ) is a binary acid. A ternary oxyacid is an aqueous solution of a compound containing hydrogen, oxygen, and one other nonmetal. HNO 3 ( aq ) is a ternary oxyacid. Aqueous Acids
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Recall, an ion is an atom or group of atoms with a charge. A positively charged ion is called a cation . A negatively charged ion is called an anion . A group of atoms bound together that has an overall charge is a polyatomic ion . Classification of Ions
Background image of page 8
Below is a flow chart for the classification of ions. Classification of Ions
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Metal atoms can lose valence electrons and become positively charged cations. Cations are named for the parent atom followed by the word “ion.” Na + is named “sodium ion” Al 3+ is named “aluminum ion” This rule applies for metal that usually form one ion. This includes the main group metals except tin and lead, along with Ag + , Zn 2+ , and Cd 2+ . Monoatomic Cations
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 37

CH 7 - CH 7: Language of Chemistry Renee Y. Becker CHM 1025...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online