CH 11B - CH 11: Gases Renee Y. Becker CHM 1025 Valencia...

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CH 11: Gases Renee Y. Becker CHM 1025 Valencia Community College 1
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2 There are 5 important properties of gases: gases have an indefinite shape gases have low densities gases can compress gases can expand gases mix completely with other gases in the same container Properties of Gases
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3 Gases have an indefinite shape: A gas takes the shape of its container, filling it completely. If the container changes shape, the gas also changes shape. Gases have low densities: The density of air is about 0.001 g/mL compared to a density of 1.0 g/mL for water. Air is about 1000 times less dense than water. Detailed Gas Properties
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4 Gases can compress: The volume of a gas decreases when the volume of its container decreases. If the volume is reduced enough, the gas will liquefy. Gases can expand: A gas constantly expands to fill a sealed container. The volume of a gas increases if there is an increase in the volume of the container. Detailed Gas Properties
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5 Gases mix completely with other gases in the same container: Air is an example of a mixture of gases. When automobiles emit nitrogen oxide gases into the atmosphere, they mix with the other atmospheric gases. A mixture of gases in a sealed container will mix to form a homogeneous mixture. Detailed Gas Properties
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6 Gas pressure is the result of constantly moving gas molecules striking the inside surface of their container. The more often the molecules collide with the sides of the container, the higher the pressure. The higher the temperature, the faster gas molecules move. Gas Pressure
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7 Atmospheric pressure is a result of the air molecules in the environment. Evangelista Torricelli invented the barometer in 1643 to measure atmospheric pressure. Atmospheric pressure is 29.9 inches of mercury or 760 torr at sea level. Atmospheric Pressure
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8 Standard pressure is the atmospheric pressure at sea level, 29.9 inches of mercury. Here is standard pressure expressed in other units: Units of Pressure
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9 The barometric pressure is 27.5 in. Hg. What is the barometric pressure in atmospheres? Use 1 atm = 29.9 in. Hg: Example 1: Gas Pressure Conversions
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Example 2: Gas Pressure Conversions The pressure of a gas is 456 mm Hg, what is the pressure in atmospheres?
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There are three variables that affect gas pressure: 1) The volume of the container. 2) The
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CH 11B - CH 11: Gases Renee Y. Becker CHM 1025 Valencia...

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