Ethogram Lab - AG - Ethogram Allison Galassie Biology 201...

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Ethogram Allison Galassie Biology 201 18 November 2006 11:00
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Introduction Ethology is defined as “the scientific and objective study of animal behavior” (Webster 131). People have been studying animals for years without giving it a name. Ethology became known to the world when Darwin did his studies, but it wasn’t really known until Karl von Frisch, Konrad Lorenz, and Niko Tinbergen did their research with it. They believed that animal behavior would tell them about how the animal’s genetics and that animals should only be studied in their natural habitats, not in laboratories like most other sciences occurring at the time. Because of their work in the ethology field, they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1973. They strived to make ethology a biological science, but since their death, it has declined. “But in its place, we now have neuroethology, behavioral ecology, behavior genetics, and behavioral phylogenetics, all of which can trace their history back to a period in the 1930s when Lorenz and Tinbergen found a novel way to explore animal behavior and managed to create a new scientific discipline while they were at it” (Alcock 502). Ethologists do their work be making ethograms, or catalogues of the behavior of a species being observed. This usually causes the ethologist to spend many hours in the field watching their study animal. They usually start with just describing the action or behavior and later on hypothesize about why the animal does that action or behavior. “Many of the behaviors described in the ethogram consist of fixed action-patterns, which are inherited, stereotyped behaviors, or instincts” (Pettijohn). That statement is the basic view of the ethologists: animals perform behavior because it is in them genetically. Ethology has expanded to also help people understand how humans work and why we do the things we do. Maybe one day it will be known if violence behavior is in the genes of some individuals or if it is just some random action by people.
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Methods and Materials The observations for this experiment were made by Allison Galassie and Kelly Martin. The first day of observations were made on November 2 from 11:30 until 11:45 AM at the tire swing, in the back area of the soccer field. The weather was nice. It was a cloudless and breezeless day and around 70˚F. The second day was November 4 from 4:30 until 5:30 PM at the Clemson Sandhill Research and Educaton Facility in Columbia. That observation day weather was around 55˚F and cold. November 5, was the third day of observations from 10:30
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This note was uploaded on 10/12/2011 for the course BIOLOGY 100 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina Upstate.

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Ethogram Lab - AG - Ethogram Allison Galassie Biology 201...

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