Christi Lynn's - Ethogram ChristiLynn LabPartners: 10:00ThursdayLab Introduction .For example, morenoise.Why?AsDavisexplains,

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ethogram Christi Lynn Lab Partners:  Payal Patel and Brooke Keverline 10:00 Thursday Lab
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Introduction The way animals behave can sometimes seem to be a complete mystery.  For  example, a dog will bark at a bicycle rider but will not look up at an airplane making far  more noise.  Why?  As Davis explains, “The environment consists of things that give  cues meaningful to particular needs of the animal” (Davis 7).  After a dog learns that the  airplane has no effect on its life, it will learn to ignore the particular noise it makes.  There are several stimuli to which an animal responds to.  These include gravity,  temperature, chemicals, energy, pressure, and electricity.  However, animals do not  respond the same way to a certain stimulus every time.  For example, an animal does not  eat every time it sees food.  Of course, the obvious explanation is that the animal is not  always hungry.  So, an animal responds to some stimuli only when it is necessary for  their survival. An animal selects its habitat based on its chance for survival.  If an animal does  not find enough food in its current environment, it will move to a different location.  If  there are predators, the animal must develop speed to escape or conceal itself to survive.  If conditions in a particular environment are unfavorable, then the animal will emigrate,  or move away from the location.  It may move a short distance or a long distance.  For  example, if a waterhole dries up, an animal will search out a new one.  However, other  animals make great seasonal migrations every year. Methods and Materials
Background image of page 2
The materials used to collect data were binoculars for observing the squirrels and  a pencil and paper for recording. The gray squirrel was observed under warm, sunny, cloudless conditions, and  under cool, sunny, and breezy conditions.   One person observed the squirrels through  binoculars and described the squirrel’s behavior to the recorder, who then wrote down  the behavior on paper with a pencil.  The position of the observer and the recorder 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/12/2011 for the course BIOLOGY 100 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina Upstate.

Page1 / 9

Christi Lynn's - Ethogram ChristiLynn LabPartners: 10:00ThursdayLab Introduction .For example, morenoise.Why?AsDavisexplains,

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online