Group1_Pace111M_TeamPresentation_Dealing with Distractions.pptx

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DISTRACTIONS AND HOW TO DEAL WITH THEMAnthony PerezArianna AndradeJohnny Sylakhom
At one point in our lives, we all have had a test, exam, or some kind of academic work to prepare for. With this preparation comes studying and we all know studying is not everyone’s favorite thing to do. Naturally, we are distracted by either internal or external distraction. Internal meaning you’re distracting yourself by surfing the web needlessly or your mind is filled with anything but your studies. External might be something along the lines of other people, friends, or family.Intro:
THERE ARE MANY WAYS TO COMBAT DISTRACTIONS. BELOW ARE SOME OF THE BEST STRATEGIES SUMMARIZED TO HELP AVOID DISTRACTIONS: Rest: The average adult needs between 7-9 hours of sleep. The better rested the brain is you are more likely to stay focused (Sleep Needs n.d.).Healthy Diet: Maintaining a healthy diet is beneficial to a healthy brain. Eating good brain food assist in brain growth and development (Harvard Health Publishing, n.d.). Some examples of “brain food” may include fish, blueberries, broccoli, eggs, and green tea (Jennings 2017).Controlling Emotions: Beginning an assignment or task with a healthy emotion can assist in staying on task and a quicker completion. Be positive and show optimism when performing a new task!Setting a Schedule: Create a time block to sit down and begin a task and have a ending time for completion. If needed, write down notes or set reminders. Work smarter, not harder: Set a break period to give your brain a break. Layout what you need to accomplish in a step process, and prepare all materials before you begin (Balkhi, 2018). Taking a break may be beneficial to the brain instead of studying non-stop.

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