AN EXEGETICAL PAPER

AN EXEGETICAL PAPER - AN EXEGETICAL PAPER ON PHILIPPIANS...

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AN EXEGETICAL PAPER ON PHILIPPIANS 3:1-11 By Nathan Ellis Presented to Dr. Greg Trull April 20, 2006 Bible Study Methods Box #621
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Summary Statement: Philippians 3:1-11 Paul tells the Church of Philippi to rejoice in the Lord and to not have any confidence in the flesh because all righteousness comes through Christ and not through human works, but also focuses on disproving the false teachings which interfere with the Philippians’ relationship with God. Outline of Philippians 3:1-11 I. Encouragement for rejoicing in the Lord (1) II. Warning against false teachings (2-4) III. Paul’s personal testimony (5-6) IV. Paul’s confidence in Christ (7-11)
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Introduction “Christ is not equally human and God, He only appeared to have human attributes.” Imagine that your pastor was out of town and a guest speaker was at your church for that Sunday, and said this to the congregation. Hopefully you would acknowledge that this is not correct and guard your mind from this false teaching. You would want to let all the other Christians who might not know that this is false, that in fact, it is false. You would not want any of your brothers or sisters in Christ to fall into this trap. When Paul heard about the false teachings at the Church of Philippi he was appalled. He knew that his fellow believers weren’t all at the point in their Christian walk to understand that not everything they heard about Christ was true, and that some would fall into this trap of false teaching. In this passage of Philippians 3:1-11 Paul makes sure that this church will not be one to fall to Satan’s weapon of false teachings. Historical Context Harper’s Bible Dictionary states that Philippi was fairly insignificant until approximately 168 B.C. when the Roman conquest of Macedonia took place. After this conquest took place, Mark Antony overpowered the Roman Republican forces in 42 B.C. and refounded Philippi as a Roman colony which is important to the book of Philippians due to the reference to the Philippians as “citizens of heaven.” Mark Antony renamed it Colonia Julia Augusta Philippensis and settled many of his retired soldiers there. Later, the city was largely populated by these veterans of war (Drane, Harper), but also consisted of other cultures besides the Romans. This could possibly be in part due to the newly constructed road “Via Egnatia”, which was a road that connected Byzantium with the Adriatic ports leading to Italy. This road caused Philippi to become a major stopping
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point, resulting in many people settling there. Philippi became very religiously eclectic because of this. Besides the Roman gods, there were Egyptian gods, gods form Cybele, and a Phrygian goddess (Harper). The Book of Philippians was written by the apostle Paul in approximately 60 A.D., which would be during the time of his first imprisonment. Paul was writing this letter because his friend Epaphroditus was visiting him in Rome and
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course BIBLE 112 taught by Professor Michael during the Fall '05 term at Corban University.

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AN EXEGETICAL PAPER - AN EXEGETICAL PAPER ON PHILIPPIANS...

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