intro_math_review

intro_math_review - Math for the Physical Sciences by...

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Unformatted text preview: Math for the Physical Sciences by Robert G. Brown Duke University Physics Department Durham, NC 27708-0305 rgb@phy.duke.edu Copyright Notice Copyright Robert G. Brown 1993, 2007 Notice This is a lecture note style review guide, originally designed to support my personal teaching activities at Duke University. It is freely available in its entirety to all the students of the world in a downloadable PDF form, or it can be be read online at: http://www.phy.duke.edu/ rgb/Class/intro math review.php and will be made available in an inexpensive print version via Lulu press as soon as it is in a sufficiently polished and complete state. I make this available for free for personal use only so that the text can be used by students all over the world regardless of their means or ability to pay. Nevertheless, I am hoping that students who truly find this work useful will purchase an (inexpensive) copy of this text, if only to help subsidize me while I continue to write more inexpensive textbooks. Be warned: As a living document that I actually use to teach, these notes may have errors of omission or commission. Expect them to change without warning as I add content or correct errors. Purchasers of any paper version should be aware of its probable imperfection and be prepared to either live with it or mark up their own copies with corrections or additions as need be (in the lecture note spirit) as I do mine. The text has generous margins, is widely spaced, and contains a number of scattered blank pages for students or instructors own use to facilitate this. Note well that this is an odd book in that it isnt intended to be used as a textbook ever for any course even though it may well prove to be better than any real textbook for learning or relearning the material it covers quickly. This is in part because this book has no homework problems in it. There are no exercises. There is no possibility of a student being given the assignment on page 23 to complete by Monday. Yet to learn something it is essential to do something and not just read a book or listen to a lecture. Tough. Maybe one day Ill write up an associated book of problems. Or (if youre using it to teach or learn math anyway) you can always make up problems of your own. Or best of all, it can be used for its intended purposes to be the book in your left hand while your right is working out homework problems in something else physics, economics, chemistry, or even algebra, trigonometrics, calculus. Math as mindless manipulation of empty symbols doesnt appeal that much even to most mathematicians. Math as a process of reasoning about problems with meaning on the other hand, can be a real pleasure!...
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This note was uploaded on 10/19/2011 for the course PHYSICS 41 taught by Professor Brown during the Spring '11 term at Duke.

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intro_math_review - Math for the Physical Sciences by...

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