review_2 - Review Problems for Introductory Physics 1...

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Unformatted text preview: Review Problems for Introductory Physics 1 August 12, 2011 Robert G. Brown, Instructor Duke University Physics Department Durham, NC 27708-0305 rgb@phy.duke.edu Copyright Notice This document is Copyright Robert G. Brown 2011. The specific date of last modification is determinable by examining the original document sources. Contents 1 Preface 3 2 Short Math Review Problems 5 3 Essential Laws, Theorems, and Principles 17 4 Short/Concept Problems 25 5 Long Problems 99 A License Terms for Review Problems for Introductory Physics297 A.1 General Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297 A.2 The One Dollar Modification to the OPL . . . . . . . . . . . . 298 A.3 OPEN PUBLICATION LICENSE Draft v0.4, 8 June 1999 . . . . 298 1 2 CONTENTS Chapter 1 Preface The problem in this review guide are provided as is without any guarantee of being correct! Thats not to suggest that they are all broken on the contrary, most of them are well-tested and have been used as homework, quiz and exam problems for decades if not centuries. It is to suggest that they have typos in them, errors of other sorts, bad figures, and one or two of them are really too difficult for this course but havent been sorted out or altered to make them doable. Leaving these in just adds to the fun. Physics problems are not all cut and dried; physics itself isnt. One thing you should be building up as you work is an appreciation for what is easy, what is difficult, what is correct and what is incorrect. If you find an error and bring it to my attention, Ill do my best to correct it, of course, but in the meantime, be warned! Note also that while a few of the problems have (rather detailed!) solutions (due to Prof. Ronen Plesser), most do not, and there never will be , at least in this review guide. I am actually philosophically opposed to providing students with solutions that they are then immediately tempted to memorize instead of learning to solve problems and work sufficiently carefully that they can trust the solutions. Students invariably then ask: But how are we to know if weve solved the problems correctly? The answer is simple. The same way you would in the real world! You should work on them in groups. Check your answers against one anothers. Build a consensus. Solve them with mentoring (there are many course TAs and profes- sors all of whom are happy to help you). Find answers through research on the web or in the literature. To be honest, almost any of these ways are good ways to learn to solve physics 3 4 CHAPTER 1. PREFACE problems. The only bad way to learn this is to have it all laid out, cut and dried, so that you dont have to struggle to learn, so that you dont have to work hard and thereby permanently imprint the knowledge on your brain as you go. Physics requires engagement and investment of time and energy like no subject you have ever taken, if only because it is one of the most difficult subjects youve ever tried to learn (at the same time it is remarkably simple,...
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This note was uploaded on 10/19/2011 for the course PHYSICS 41 taught by Professor Brown during the Spring '11 term at Duke.

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review_2 - Review Problems for Introductory Physics 1...

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