Psych3-8

Psych3-8 - 3/8 What is temerament? o Individual differences...

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3/8 What is temerament? o Individual differences in emotional, motor, and attentional reactivity and regulation. o Genetic and Biological o Different conceptions of temperament o Easy (40%): even tempered, positive, open to new experiences Difficult (10%): active, irritable, irregular activity Slow-to-warm-up (15%): inactive, moody, mildly negative to novelty Rhythm of biological functions Activity level, approach or withdrawal, adaptability, sensory threshold, mood predominance, intensity), distractibility, persistence on task Stable across time, innate (genetic), universal across cultures o Emotionality, Activity, Sociability, Impulsiveness (EASI) These four dimensions interact with each other to create temperaments Innate, stable across time, universal o Rothbart (1981) Most contemporary model Two dimensions are interactive Physiological reactivity Self-regulation Stable, biological, universal, modifiable o Eysenck (1959) Earliest model Circumplex model (interactive) Neuroticism (highly reactive)/Stablity Spectrum ranging from stable to neurotic Reactive limbic system o Part of brain responsible for emotional Introversion/Extroversion Spectrum Stimulation and optimal level of arousal
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This note was uploaded on 10/20/2011 for the course PSYC 103 taught by Professor Regalo during the Spring '11 term at UNL.

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Psych3-8 - 3/8 What is temerament? o Individual differences...

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