Chapter 6 - Chapter 6: General Principals of Pharmacology...

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Chapter 6 : General Principals of Pharmacology Part 1: Drugs - a chemical used to diagnose, treat, or prevent disease. Pharmacology - the study of drugs and their interactions w/ the body. Drug Names Chemical name - the most detailed name for any drug, which states it’s chemical composition & molecular structure. Ex) 7-chloro-1, 3-dihydro-1-methyl-5- phenyl-2H-1, 4-benzodiazepin-2-one Generic name - is usually suggested by the manufacturer and confirmed by the United States Adopted Name Council. Ex) diazepam Official name - it becomes the FDA’s official name when it is listed in the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP). Ex) diazepam, USP Brand name - manufacturer gives drug a brand name to foster brand loyalty among its customers. Ex) Valium® or ™ 4 Main Sources of Drugs Plants- Oldest source Animals Minerals Synthetic (Laboratory Made) Sources of Drug Information USP (United States Pharmacopoeia) PDR (Physician’s Desk Reference) Drug Information Monthly Prescribing Reference AMA Drug Evaluation Legal -The laws and Regulations come from 3 distinct authorities: Federal law o Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 o Harrison Narcotic Act of 1914 o Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act of 1938 1951 Durham-Humphrey Amendment- also known as the prescription drug amendment o Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970 State law Individual agency regulations Schedules of Drugs According to the Controlled Substance Act of 1970 Schedule I - High abuse potential; may lead to severe dependence; no accepted medical indications; used for research, analysis or instruction only. Ex) Heroin, LSD, Mescaline Schedule II - High abuse potential; may lead to severe dependence; accepted medical indications. Ex) Opium, cocaine, morphine, codeine, oxycodone, methadone, secobarbital.
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Schedule III - Less abuse potential than Schedule I & II; may lead to moderate or low physical dependence or high psychological dependence; accepted medical indications. Ex) Limited opioid amounts or combined w/noncontrolled substances: Vicodin, Tylenol w/codeine Schedule IV - Low abuse potential compared to Schedule III; limited psychological and /or physical dependence; accepted medical indications. Ex) Diazepam, lorazepam, Phenobarbital Schedule V - Lower abuse potential compared to Schedule IV; may lead to limited physical or psychological dependence; accepted medical indications. Ex) Limited amounts of opioids; often for cough or diarrhea. Components of a Drug Profile Names Classification - (in Part 2) is the broad group to which the drug belongs. Mechanism of action - the way in which a drug causes its effects; it’s pharmacodynamics. Indications
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Chapter 6 - Chapter 6: General Principals of Pharmacology...

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