Chapter 26 - Chapter 26 Abdominal Trauma-Because the abdomen is bound by muscles rather than skeletal structures there is a freer transmission of

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Chapter 26: Abdominal Trauma -Because the abdomen is bound by muscles rather than skeletal structures, there is a freer transmission of the energy of trauma to the internal organs and structures. -Penetrating trauma most frequently involves the liver and small bowel. Injury to the Abdominal Wall With trauma to the abdomen, the discoloration of Ecchymosis and noticeable swelling require several hours to develop. Evisceration - a protrusion of organs from a wound. o Tx: moist sterile dressing Injury to the Hollow Organs ; the stomach, small bowel, large bowel, rectum, urinary bladder, gallbladder, and pregnant uterus may rupture w/compression form blunt forces, especially if the organ is full and distended. Peritonitis - inflammation of the peritoneal from rupture of Hollow organs and spilling of it’s contents; may lead to Sepsis. o Rebound tenderness- pain on release of the examiner’s hands, allowing the patient’s abdominal wall to return to its normal position; associated
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2011 for the course PARAMEDIC 101 taught by Professor Bator during the Spring '11 term at Columbus State Community College.

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Chapter 26 - Chapter 26 Abdominal Trauma-Because the abdomen is bound by muscles rather than skeletal structures there is a freer transmission of

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